Six Foot walking track

Blue Mountains National Park

Overview

A challenging 3-day hike, Six Foot walking track winds through state forests and Blue Mountains National Park from Katoomba to Jenolan Caves, passing rivers and waterfalls.

Where
Blue Mountains National Park
Distance
46km one-way
Time suggested
3 days
Grade
Hard
Price
Free
What to
bring
Drinking water, hat, sunscreen, clothes for all weather conditions, compass, personal locator beacon, sleeping bag, sturdy shoes, topographic map, tent
Please note
  • This walk is managed by the Department of Primary Industry - Crown land. For more information visit the Six Foot Track website
  • If you're planning a long hike or visiting a remote part of the Greater Blue Mountains wilderness, drop into the Blue Mountains Heritage Centre in Blackheath,  to complete a trip intention form and hire a personal locator beacon (PLB).
  • Check the weather before you set out as Six Foot walking track can become boggy when it rains.

Looking for an exhilarating adventure that will give your mind and body a hard yet exhilarating workout? The dynamic Six Foot walking track packs it all into a three-day hike for enthusiastic bushwalkers. Winding through state forests and Blue Mountains National Park, this historic track takes in heritage sites, heath, woodlands, and rainforest, with several opportunities for excellent overnight camping.

Following an 1884 heritage horse track, this challenging walk starts near Katoomba, passing cascading waterfalls and wild rivers into the Megalong Valley and village, before crossing a unique swing bridge, climbing the range, and arriving at Jenolan Caves.

At night, cook up a hearty meal and enjoy some stargazing before falling asleep to the sounds of the bush. Alternatively, if you don’t feel like completing the entire walk, shorter sections can be undertaken.

For directions, safety and practical information, see visitor info

Current alerts in this area

There are no current alerts in this area.

Local alerts

For the latest updates on fires, closures and other alerts in this area, see https://www.nationalparks.nsw.gov.au/things-to-do/walking-tracks/six-foot-walking-track/local-alerts

Park info

See more visitor info

Visitor info

All the practical information you need to know about Six Foot walking track.

Getting there and parking

Get driving directions

Get directions

    Six Foot track starts in the Katoomba precinct of Blue Mountains National Park. To get there, follow signs to Explorers Tree between Katoomba and Medlow Bath on Great Western Highway.

    Park entry points

    Parking

    Parking is available at Explorers Tree.

    Facilities

    • Campgrounds with toilet facilities are located at Old Ford Reserve, Cox’s River and Black Range. At Allum Creek, there’s a campground, but there are no toilet facilities.
    • Cottage accommodation is available at Jenolan Caves Cottages, 4km from Jenolan Caves.

    Maps and downloads

    Safety messages

    Bushwalking safety

    If you're keen to head out on a longer walk or a backpack camp, always be prepared. Read these bushwalking safety tips before you set off on a walking adventure in national parks.

    Mobile safety

    Dial Triple Zero (000) in an emergency. Download the Emergency + app before you visit, it helps emergency services locate you using your smartphone's GPS. Please note there is limited mobile phone reception in this park and you’ll need mobile reception to call Triple Zero (000).

    River and lake safety

    The aquatic environment around rivers, lakes and lagoons can be unpredictable. If you're visiting these areas, take note of these river and lake safety tips.

    Prohibited

    Pets

    Pets and domestic animals (other than certified assistance animals) are not permitted. Find out which regional parks allow dog walking and see the OEH pets in parks policy for more information.

    Smoking

    NSW national parks are no smoking areas.

    Visitor centre

    Nearby towns

    Katoomba (33 km)

    Katoomba is at the heart of most of the stunning natural attractions that make up the Blue Mountains National Park. You can admire deep valleys, sandstone plateaus, waterfalls and native animals from the many walking trails and lookouts near Katoomba.

    www.visitnsw.com

    Lithgow (39 km)

    Hassans Walls Lookout, near Lithgow, is the highest in the Blue Mountains. Admire Mt Wilson, Mt York, Mt Tarana and Mt Blaxland as well as the pretty Hartley Valley below. To the south are the Kanimbla and Megalong valley and Mt Bindo. While there, go for a walk or ride around the lookout.

    www.visitnsw.com

    Megalong Valley (32 km)

    The Six Foot Track wends its way through Megalong Valley, as well as through the area's state forests and national parks. People generally take three days to tackle the 45-kilometre Six Foot Track, but you can opt for shorter walks on a daytrip or an overnight camping excursion. 

    www.visitnsw.com

    Learn more

    Six Foot walking track is in Blue Mountains National Park. Here are just some of the reasons why this park is special:

    A diversity of rare or threatened species

    Black cockatoos. Photo: K Stepnell

    The diversity of environments across Blue Mountains National Park create habitats for wide range of native plants and animals, including many rare or threatened species. There are rare and ancient plants in its forests, and isolated animal populations tucked away in its deep gorges. Over 1000 species of flowering plants occur in the park, including the waratah, the floral emblem of NSW. Blue Mountains National Park also protects the habitat of 41 threatened animal species including the sooty owl, glossy black cockatoo, bush stone curlew, superb parrot, yellow-bellied glider and booroolong frog. Some of these threatened species are endemic to the Blue Mountains, including the Blue Mountains water skink.

    • Blue Gum Forest Blue Gum Forest is a fine, historic example of closed forest, situated in Grose Valley in Blue Mountains National Park. Get to it by walking track from Perrys lookdown or Pierces Pass.
    • Blue Mountains adventure and hike Be taken into the heart of the Blue Mountains for a big day of hiking and exploring on this full day tour. Pass impressive lookouts and waterfalls before visiting the iconic Three Sisters near Katoomba.  
    • Grand Canyon track Setting out from Evans lookout near Blackheath in the Blue Mountains, be met with a series of waterfalls, creeks and spectacular views along the challenging Grand Canyon track.
    • International student tour: Blue Mountains Immerse yourself in the majestic environment of Blue Mountains National Park, a special World Heritage-listed site on the doorstep of Sydney.
    • International student tour: Grand Canyon Experience this magnificent rainforest environment in the Blue Mountains National Park. Descend into a special slot canyon, past creeks and waterfalls, and learn about local wildlife along the way.
    • WilderQuest Billy tea with a bushman Are you keen to roast a marshmallow over a campfire? Join the WilderQuest fun these school holidays and listen to stories in Blue Mountains National Park.
    • WilderQuest Sticks and stones Do you enjoy being creative and exploring the outdoors? These school holidays join the WilderQuest fun in Blue Mountains National Park. You’ll take part in nature-based games led by our NPWS rangers.
    • WilderQuest WildThings Come on a WilderQuest WildThings excursion for Stage 1 students, focusing on science and technology. Investigate the living world in Blue Mountains National Park, home to the world famous Blue Gum Forest and towering waterfalls.
    • WilderQuest WildTracker Come on a WilderQuest WildTracker school excursion for Stage 2 students, focusing on science and technology. Students will carry out investigations and explore the living world in Blue Mountains National Park.
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    A walker's paradise

    National Pass Walk, Blue Mountains National Park. Photo: Craig Marshall Copyright:NSW Government

    The Blue Mountains boasts one of the most complex track systems of any national park in Australia. Dating from as early as 1825, many of the constructed tracks have national, state and regional significance and several are named to commemorate significant periods or events in Australia's history. The National Pass is one of the Blue Mountains iconic walking tracks. Constructed in 1906-1907, the track was built with shovels, crowbars and dynamite. In 2002 the track underwent major restoration works that included helicopters depositing sandstone blocks along the trail and heritage stonemasons perching on cliff faces to set sandstone inserts into steps eroded over the years by weather and walkers. It's an inspiring walk, with fantastic views of the Jamison Valley and beautiful waterfalls at either end.

    • Conservation Hut Conservation Hut at Wentworth Falls is a great spot for a bite to eat. Enjoy a view of the World Heritage listed Blue Mountains National Park from the café’s balcony.
    • Echo Point lookout (Three Sisters) Take a day trip to Echo Point lookout in Katoomba for stunning views of the valley and the iconic Three Sisters.
    • Greater Blue Mountains drive Greater Blue Mountains Drive takes in the iconic scenery of the Greater Blue Mountains World Heritage Area. Explore Glenbrook, Wentworth Falls and Katoomba and beyond.

    Ancient connections

    Red Hands Cave, Blue Mountains National Park. Photo: Nick Cubbin

    Blue Mountains National Park is part of the traditional land of the Gundungurra, Darkinjung, Darug and Wiradjuri peoples, who have been here since time began, living off the sea and the land. The Aboriginal sites in Blue Mountains National Park are important to Aboriginal people today; they are the physical evidence of a link to their ancestors. As you walk through this area, take some time to think about Aboriginal people and their strong attachment to this ancient landscape and all it contains. Some sites within the park, such as Red Hands Cave, are marked and other sites are not, so please take care when you're exploring the park.

    • International student tour: Living country, living culture Come and explore the rich, innovative and sustainable culture of Australia’s First People. Watch a hands-on presentation to learn about traditional and contemporary Aboriginal culture.
    • Living Country, living culture: Aboriginal discovery Living Country, living culture is a Stage 2 (Years 3-4) school excursion in Blue Mountains National Park, focusing on HSIE. Understand and appreciate traditional and contemporary Aboriginal culture with Aboriginal Discovery rangers.
    • Living Country, living culture: Aboriginal Discovery Living Country, living culture is a Stage 1 (Years 1-2) school excursion in Blue Mountains National Park, focusing on HSIE. Students will explore and appreciate traditional and contemporary Aboriginal culture with Aboriginal Discovery rangers.
    • Red Hands Cave Red Hands Cave in Blue Mountains National Park is one of the best showcases of Aboriginal rock art in the area. The walk starts at Euroka campground or Glenbrook carpark.
    • Red Hands Cave walking track - Blue Mountains National Park Red Hands Cave walking track, in Blue Mountains National Park, offers impressive Aboriginal stencil art with picnicking and birdwatching, near Glenbrook.
    • Three Sisters walk The easy Three Sisters walk, in Katoomba, offers some of the most iconic views in Blue Mountains National Park, and takes you up close to the famous Three Sisters.
    • WilderQuest Stories around the campfire This winter, join this hands-on WilderQuest activity in Blue Mountains National Park. You’ll hear Aboriginal cultural stories told by an Aboriginal NSW National Parks ranger.
    • WilderQuest WildThings Come on a WilderQuest WildThings excursion for Stage 1 students, focusing on science and technology. Investigate the living world in Blue Mountains National Park, home to the world famous Blue Gum Forest and towering waterfalls.
    • WilderQuest WildTracker Come on a WilderQuest WildTracker school excursion for Stage 2 students, focusing on science and technology. Students will carry out investigations and explore the living world in Blue Mountains National Park.
    Show more

    Greater Blue Mountains World Heritage Area

     Narrow Neck trail, Blue Mountains National Park. Photo: Steve Alton

    It is truly amazing to think that a city the size of Sydney has the extraordinary one million hectare Blue Mountains just a couple of hours away. It is part of a World Heritage - listed area of amazing values - geographic, botanic and cultural with six Aboriginal groups having connection to the country of the area. 

    Read more

    The forests of the Greater Blue Mountains World Heritage Area have been described as a natural laboratory for the evolution of eucalypts; more than 90 different eucalypt species are found here, some 13 per cent of all eucalypt species in the world. They grow in a great variety of communities, from tall closed forests, through open forests and woodlands, to the stunted mallee shrublands on the plateaus. Try the overnight hike to Blue Gum Forest where you can camp beneath the stately tall trees with their smooth white-blue-grey bark.

    • Blue Mountains National Park part of a World Heritage site Blue Mountains National Park part of a World Heritage site, is a school excursion for Stage 5 (Years 9-10) students with a focus on science. The Greater Blue Mountains World Heritage Area is Australia's 14th World Heritage Site and comprises 1 million hectares of protected bushland on Sydney's doorstep.
    • Blue Mountains National Park part of a World Heritage site Blue Mountains National Park part of a World Heritage site, is a school excursion for Stage 4 (Years 7-8) students with a focus on geography. The Greater Blue Mountains World Heritage Area is Australia's 14th World Heritage Site and comprises 1 million hectares of protected bushland on Sydney's doorstep.
    • Echo Point lookout (Three Sisters) Take a day trip to Echo Point lookout in Katoomba for stunning views of the valley and the iconic Three Sisters.
    • Greater Blue Mountains drive Greater Blue Mountains Drive takes in the iconic scenery of the Greater Blue Mountains World Heritage Area. Explore Glenbrook, Wentworth Falls and Katoomba and beyond.
    • International student tour: Blue Mountains Immerse yourself in the majestic environment of Blue Mountains National Park, a special World Heritage-listed site on the doorstep of Sydney.
    • International student tour: National Pass Descend heritage hand-carved stone steps of the Grand Stairway and pass a mighty waterfall on this tour. Experience the beautiful rainforest environment and sweeping views of Blue Mountains National Park.
    • Mount Solitary walking track Take a challenging, multi-day hike over Mount Solitary in Blue Mountains National Park. Enjoy scenic mountain views, historic heritage, and bush camping, starting out from Katoomba.
    Show more

    Plants and animals you may see

    Animals

    •  Superb lyrebird, Minnamurra Rainforest, Budderoo National Park. Photo: David Finnegan

      Superb lyrebird (Menura novaehollandiae)

      With a complex mimicking call and an elaborate courtship dance to match, the superb lyrebird is one of the most spectacular Australian animals. A bird watching must-see, the superb lyrebird can be found in rainforests and wet woodlands across eastern NSW and Victoria.

    • Satin bowerbird. Photo: Ken Stepnell

      Satin bowerbird (Ptilonorhynchus violaceus)

      With vibrant blue-violet eyes and curious antics, the satin bowerbird is a favourite for bird watching and easy to spot as it forages for food in open forest. Relatively common across eastern Australia, in NSW they’re found in coastal rainforests and adjacent woodlands and mountain ranges.

    Plants

    • Smooth-barked apple. Photo: Jaime Plaza

      Smooth-barked apple (Angophora costata)

      Smooth-barked apple gums, also known as Sydney red gum or rusty gum trees, are Australian native plants found along the NSW coast, and in the Sydney basin and parts of Queensland. Growing to heights of 15-30m, the russet-coloured angophoras shed their bark in spring to reveal spectacular new salmon-coloured bark.

    • Old man banksia, Moreton National Park. Photo: John Yurasek

      Old man banksia (Banksia serrata)

      Hardy Australian native plants, old man banksias can be found along the coast, and in the dry sclerophyll forests and sandstone mountain ranges of NSW. With roughened bark and gnarled limbs, they produce a distinctive cylindrical yellow-green banksia flower which blossoms from summer to early autumn.

    • Waratah. Photo: Barry Collier

      Waratah (Telopea speciosissima)

      The beautiful waratah is not only the NSW floral emblem, it's also one of the best-known Australian native plants. This iconic Australian bush flower can be found on sandstone ridges around Sydney, in nearby mountain ranges and on the NSW South Coast. The waratah has a vibrant crimson flowerhead, measuring up to 15cm across, and blossoms in spring.

    Environments in this park

    Education resources (1)

    School excursions (16)

    Six Foot Track, Blue Mountains National Park. Photo: Steve Alton/NSW Government