Thredbo-Perisher area

Kosciuszko National Park

Overview

Thredbo-Perisher area is your gateway to Mount Kosciuszko. Find NSW's favourite ski resorts, top alpine hikes, mountain bike trails, and endless adventures in the Snowy Mountains.

Read more about Thredbo-Perisher area

In winter, ski or snowboard the slopes at ThredboPerisher or Charlotte Pass. Perisher is the largest ski resort in the Southern Hemisphere. Try cross country skiing or snowshoe the pristine trails amongst twisted snow gums.

As the snow melts you'll discover a walker's paradise. Tracks range from short riverside strolls and moderate day walks, to multi-day hikes. Conquer Mount Kosciuszko, Australia's highest mountain, on the Thredbo to Kosciuszko walk. You can also take the longer Summit trail or Main Range walk. Have your camera ready for mountain panoramas, dazzling summer wildflowers, and the famous Snowy River.

Thrill seekers can hit some of Australia's best mountain bike runs, including Thredbo Valley track. The scenery is also a stunning backdrop for festivals, summer fishing, or even a wedding at historic Bullocks Hut.

With year-round alpine activities you'll need several days to make the most of the Snowies. Why not pitch your tent at a riverside campground, or stay at Creel Lodge or Numbananga Lodge.

Current alerts in this area

There are no current alerts in this area.

Local alerts

For the latest updates on fires, closures and other alerts in this area, see https://www.nationalparks.nsw.gov.au/visit-a-park/parks/thredbo-perisher-area/local-alerts

Contact

  • in Kosciuszko National Park in the Snowy Mountains region
  • The Thredbo-Perisher area is open all year, but some roads and trails may close due to weather conditions or park management issues. Kosciuszko Road is closed between Perisher and Charlotte Pass in winter (June to October long weekends).
  • Park entry fees apply on Alpine Way and Kosciuszko Road

    Winter (June to October long weekends): $29 per vehicle per day (24hrs from purchase); motorcycles $12; bus passengers $11.45 per adult, $3.60 per child per day. Find out more about the winter entry surcharge.

    Rest of Year: $17 per vehicle per day (24hrs); motorcycles $7; bus passengers $6.60 per adult, $2.20 per child per day.

    Passes: Day passes, multi-day passes and annual All Parks Pass available from NPWS visitor centres, local agents and operating vehicle entry stations. Read our Annual Pass FAQs for information. Short Breaks Pass: $68 for 5 days park entry at price of 4 days (not valid winter). Eligible pensioners can apply for a complementary NPWS concession pass, to get free park entry. Download the exemption form (154KB doc).

    Buy annual pass (//pass.nationalparks.nsw.gov.au/).
  • More
    • Perisher Valley office
      02 6457 4444
      Contact hours: Winter (June to October long weekends): Daily 8.30am to 4pm. Closed 12 to 1pm. Rest of year: Monday to Friday 8.30am to 4pm. Closed 12 to 1pm weekdays, all day Saturday and Sunday.
    • 9914 Kosciuszko Road, Perisher Valley NSW 2624
    • Email: perisher@environment.nsw.gov.au
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See more visitor info

Visitor info

All the practical information you need to know about the Thredbo-Perisher area.

Getting there and parking

Get driving directions

Get directions

    To get to the Thredbo-Perisher area of Kosciuszko National Park:

    From Canberra via Jindabyne to Thredbo:

    • Travel 95km along the Monaro Highway to Cooma
    • Drive through Cooma for 7km
    • Continue onto Jindabyne Road (signs for Kosciuszko Road) for 45km to Jindabyne
    • Follow Kosciuszko Road 3km out of Jindabyne and turn left onto Alpine Way. Thredbo Village is around 32km:

    From Jindabyne to Perisher and Charlotte Pass:

    • Follow Kosciuszko Road for around 33km to Perisher Valley or 41km to Charlotte Pass
    • Access to Charlotte Pass during winter is by Oversnow Transport from Perisher, or Skitube from Bullocks Flat, along Alpine Way

    From Hume Highway via Khancoban:

    • Take Murray Valley Highway from Albury for 15km, or Jingellic Road from Holbrook for 121km, towards Corryong and Khancoban
    • From Khancoban follow Alpine Way 76km to Thredbo
    • Allow around 3.5hrs

    In summer, Mount Kosciuszko is accessed on foot from Thredbo via the Kosciuszko Express chairlift, or take Summit trail or Main Range walk from Charlotte Pass turning circle, at the end of Kosciuszko Road.

    If you’re driving to Kosciuszko National Park, you’ll now pass traffic monitoring cameras on the way to Thredbo and Perisher resorts. Learn more.

    Park entry points

    Parking Show more

    Winter road access

    Road closures Perisher to Charlotte Pass

    • Kosciuszko Road is closed between Perisher and Charlotte Pass from June to October long weekends.
    • You can use the free overnight parking at Bullocks Flat Skitube terminal, off Alpine Way (no park entry fees in this section of Alpine Way). Then ride the Skitube to Perisher and Blue Cow resorts.
    • Charlotte Pass oversnow transport departs from Perisher Skitube terminal.

    Snow chains

    It's compulsory for all 2WD vehicles to carry snow chains in winter, between June and October long weekends, on:

    • Kosciuszko Road (to Perisher)
    • Guthega Road
    • Alpine Way between Thredbo and Tom Groggin

    The Roads and Maritime Service (RMS) recommends snow chains are carried by all vehicles driving in the park in winter, including 4WD and AWD, in the event of extreme weather. Visit the Live Traffic website for current conditions.

    Winter parking restrictions

    If travelling to Perisher or Charlotte Pass in winter, there's no public overnight parking beyond Sawpit Creek. Check car parking options with your Perisher accommodation before arrival, or park for free at Bullocks Flat and take the Skitube to Perisher.

    Best times to visit

    The Thredbo-Perisher area spoils you with some of Kosciuszko National Park's most beautiful scenery and exhilarating activities. Here are some highlights:

    Autumn

    Lace-up for a hike in the Main Range or Ramshead Range without the summer flies. Take to 2 wheels on a mountain bike, and marvel at the snow gums' bark striped with orange and green. It's an ideal time for boating or paddling on Lake Jindabyne, or a last attempt to catch that fish before the cool weather and snow sets in.

    Spring

    Spring is a great time to rediscover the outdoors on a bushwalking, riding or camping getaway. The first wildflowers awaken, rivers run fast with snow melt and the days aren't too hot to explore the country's highest mountains. Late season snow on the high slopes also offers some great cross-country skiing in the back country, if you're well-prepared.

    Summer

    Come summer, the high country is blanketed in wildflowers like yellow buttercups, white snow daisies, and purple hovea, reaching their peak in January. This is festival season, when jazz and blues music fills Thredbo's hills and world-class athletes tackle the roads and trails. Summer's also a popular time to learn more about the unique alpine landscape on a guided tour, or the Kosciuszko Education Centre's special school excursions.

    Winter

    In winter, from the June to October long weekends, the Snowy Mountains live up to their name. Take your pick of ski resorts from vast and varied Perisher, snowbound Charlotte Pass, or Thredbo with its alpine village vibe. Snow sports include skiing and snowboarding, cross-country skiing and snowshoeing. There's also plenty of apres ski entertainment.

    Facilities

    Maps and downloads

    Fees and passes

    Park entry fees apply on Alpine Way and Kosciuszko Road

    Winter (June to October long weekends): $29 per vehicle per day (24hrs from purchase); motorcycles $12; bus passengers $11.45 per adult, $3.60 per child per day. Find out more about the winter entry surcharge.

    Rest of Year: $17 per vehicle per day (24hrs); motorcycles $7; bus passengers $6.60 per adult, $2.20 per child per day.

    Passes: Day passes, multi-day passes and annual All Parks Pass available from NPWS visitor centres, local agents and operating vehicle entry stations. Read our Annual Pass FAQs for information. Short Breaks Pass: $68 for 5 days park entry at price of 4 days (not valid winter). Eligible pensioners can apply for a complementary NPWS concession pass, to get free park entry. Download the exemption form (154KB doc).

    • All Parks Pass - For all parks in NSW (including Kosciuszko NP) $190 (1 year) / $335 (2 years)

    Annual passes and entry fees (https://www.nationalparks.nsw.gov.au/passes-and-fees)

    Safety messages

    All Kosciuszko National Park visitors planning a long hike, off-track or overnight adventure, or visiting a remote part of the park, are recommended to fill in the trip intention form and carry a Personal Locator Beacon (PLB). Find out more about hiring a PLB and completing a trip intention form on the dedicated iPads available at Snowy Region Visitor Centre, Tumut Visitor Centre and the Perisher NSW National Parks office.

    Alpine safety

    Alpine areas present special safety issues. Conditions can be extreme and may change rapidly, particularly in winter. It’s important to be prepared and find out how to stay safe in alpine areas.

    Mobile safety

    Dial Triple Zero (000) in an emergency. Download the Emergency + app before you visit, it helps emergency services locate you using your smartphone's GPS. Please note there is limited mobile phone reception in this park and you’ll need mobile reception to call Triple Zero (000).

    River and lake safety

    The aquatic environment around rivers, lakes and lagoons can be unpredictable. If you're visiting these areas, take note of these river and lake safety tips.

    Permitted

    Cycling

    Cycling is permitted on public roads, and on all management trails outside wilderness areas. Within the Pilot Wilderness Area you can cycle on Cascade trail, Ingeegoodbee trail, and Nine Mile trail. Please note cycling is permitted on Kosciuszko Summit trail from Charlotte Pass only as far as Rawson Pass. Riders please give way to walkers.

    Fishing

    You can go fishing in the Thredbo-Perisher area in summer only. Fishing is not permitted between the June and October long weekends. A current NSW recreational fishing licence is required when fishing in all waters.

    Prohibited

    Pets

    Pets and domestic animals (other than certified assistance animals) are not permitted. Find out which regional parks allow dog walking and see the pets in parks policy for more information.

    Smoking

    NSW national parks are no smoking areas. The alpine resorts of Thredbo, Perisher, Charlotte Pass, Ski Rider and Kosciuszko Tourist Park are exempt, though some commercial and outdoor places within these resorts may have no smoking areas.

    Visitor centre

    Nearby towns

    Jindabyne (8 km)

    For those heading to the Snowy Mountains snowfields, Jindabyne is a great place to hire or buy all of your skiing and snowboarding essentials from equipment to fashion.

    www.visitnsw.com

    Cooma (65 km)

    The Snowy Hydro Discovery Centre is a state-of-the-art visitor facility showcasing the story of the Snowy Mountains Hydro-Electric Scheme from the early construction days to the role the scheme plays today in the development of Australia.

    www.visitnsw.com

    Khancoban (70 km)

    Plan ahead for your Snowy Mountains getaway and check out what's on in Khancoban. Extreme athletes love the Upper Murray Challenge that consists of a 38-km bike ride, a 26-km paddle and a 25-km run. The annual Khancoban TroutFest takes place every November at several area fishing holes.

    www.visitnsw.com

    Learn more

    Thredbo-Perisher area is a special place. Here are just some of the reasons why:

    Explore the rooftop of Australia

    Snowy Region Visitor in Jindabyne, gateway to Kosciuszko National Park. Photo: Elinor Sheargold/OEH

    Skiers and snowboarders will be familiar with the fabulous snow sport facilities at Thredbo, Perisher and Charlotte Pass, but there are endless activities year-round. This area is a mecca for walkers and riders. Take in the spectacular 3600 views from Snow Gums boardwalk or Dead Horse Gap walk. A hike to Mount Kosciuszko is a must, while the awe-inspiring Main Range loop explores glacial lakes and the dramatic Western Fall. Take to 2 wheels on Thredbo Valley track, or get an adrenaline charge on the famous Cannonball Run. If you need some inspiration, stop by the Snowy Region Visitor Centre for tips on top experiences, guided tours, and where to stay. Kids can also learn more on a school excursion to the Kosciuszko Education Centre.

    • Kosciuszko walk - Thredbo to Mount Kosciuszko This iconic day walk from Thredbo will have you conquering the summit of Mount Kosciuszko in a couple of hours. You'll quite literally be on a high as you soak in the epic views from Australia's highest point.
    • Perisher Visitor Office Perisher Visitor Office, in the heart of Perisher Valley, is a handy last-minute stop for advice, maps, hiking essentials and important information before your alpine adventures in Kosciuszko National Park.
    • Schlink Hut walking track Schlink Hut walking track is a high alpine hiking or mountain biking adventure near Perisher, visiting 3 historic huts in Kosciuszko National Park. Winter access is by snowshoe or cross-country skiing only.
    • Snowy Region Visitor Centre Snowy Region Visitor Centre, in Jindabyne, is a great place for visitors to get information, brochures, maps and park entry passes before heading into Kosciuszko National Park.
    • Thredbo Valley track adventure rides Experienced mountain bike riders can get their thrills on Thredbo Valley track in Kosciuszko National Park. From the world-class 35km ride, to short technical sections, try these adventure options.
    • Thredbo Valley track easy rides If you're looking for an easy mountain bike ride in the Snowy Mountains, try these family-friendly sections of the famous Thredbo Valley track, between Thredbo village and historic Bullocks Hut.
    • Water in the world - protecting an alpine catchment Water in the world - protecting an alpine catchment is a school excursion in Kosciuszko National Park for Stage 4 (Years 7-8) geography students. Learn about the management of water quality at a ski resort and the importance of protected catchments in this area.
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    Unique landscapes

    Snowy River crossing at Charlotte Pass on Main Range walk, Kosciuszko National Park. Photo: Elinor Sheargold/DPIE

    Kosciuszko National Park is a huge park containing Australia's only true alpine environment, the highest part of the Great Dividing Range, and all of NSW's ski resorts. Above the treeline of snow gums - the only trees to grow at this altitude - is a unique landscape of alpine herb fields, feldmark, bogs and tarns. A walk to the highest peak in mainland Australia, Mount Kosciuszko, is the perfect way to see this landscape. Walk from Thredbo or Charlotte Pass, and marvel at the huge granite tors and lakes carved out during Australia's last Ice Age, between 35,000 and 10,000 years ago.

    • 7-day Snowy Mountains and Mount Kosciuszko walk Cross Kosciuszko National Park on a 7-day, self-guided walk with Auswalk. Absorb the sights of the Snowy Mountains, including Thredbo Valley, Charlotte Pass and the summit of Mount Kosciuszko.
    • Cross-country mountain bike tours Challenge yourself on the brilliant trails of Kosciuszko National Park with K7 Adventures. From beginner to advanced level, there's a mountain bike experience waiting for you in the Snowy Mountains.
    • E-bike tour: Lake Crackenback to Hatchery Bay Take off on a guided e-bike tour from Lake Crackenback Resort and Spa along lower Thredbo Valley track in Koscuiszko National Park. This 1-day, 28km wilderness adventure is great for intermediate riders.
    • Fly fishing tuition and guided tours Explore the peaceful beauty of Thredbo River on a fly fishing guided tour in Kosciuszko National Park. Learn new skills or practise old ones with the help of The Fly Program. All equipment provided.
    • Going up the mountain Going up the mountain is a school excursion in Kosciuszko National Park for Stage 6 (Years 11-12) students focusing on Geography. Students will use field work to record and compare the geology, weather, native plants, animals, human use and sustainability of the montane, sub-alpine and alpine ecosystems.
    • Kosciuszko - a special place Kosciuszko a special place is a presentation for stage 6 (year 11-12) students focusing on Geography. This excursion highlights the unique natural and cultural features of Kosciuszko National Park, interaction of the four spheres, human impacts, sustainability and park management. Students have the opportunity to have their questions answered by an NPWS education officer.
    • Kosciuszko walk - Thredbo to Mount Kosciuszko This iconic day walk from Thredbo will have you conquering the summit of Mount Kosciuszko in a couple of hours. You'll quite literally be on a high as you soak in the epic views from Australia's highest point.
    • Mountain bike adventures for schools Mountain biking on Thredbo Valley track in Kosciuszko National Park is a fantastic experience for students. Let Action Learning Initiatives design the perfect program for your school group.
    • Snowy Mountains 5-day walking tour Escape to the Snowy Mountains and explore Kosciuszko National Park with Park Trek. This 5-day guided walking holiday visits highlights like Blue Lake, Thredbo Valley and Mount Kosciuszko.
    • Thredbo Valley trail guided mountain bike ride Enjoy a guided mountain bike tour along Thredbo Valley trail with Bike and Fitness. Their professional mountain bike coaches will lead you on a fun ride along one of Australia’s most scenic trails.
    • Women's mountain bike retreats Enjoy a weekend away with a women's mountain bike retreat at Lake Crackenback. With Dirt Skills and Frills, you'll take on Thredbo Valley track but also get to relax with a massage or yoga.
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    Alpine plants and animals

    Corroboree frog (Pseudophryne corroboree), Kosciuszko National Park. Photo: John Spencer

    The park has over 200 species of alpine flowering plants and provides important habitat to nationally endangered species, such as southern corroboree frogs and broad-toothed rats. Ancient snow gums, twisted and stunted from the blasting effects of wind, snow and ice, mix with alpine ash and fragrant alpine mint bush. Above the treeline only heath, snow grass and the hardiest plants face the cold. Slow-growing mountain plum pine, some over 500 years-old, cling to boulders for warmth, providing shelter and food for threatened mountain pygmy-possums. Bogs of spongy sphagnum moss soak up the snow melt, to be released into alpine streams. From late spring to early summer, the heath is dotted with patches of wildflowers like alpine sunrays and snow daisies, yellow billy buttons, and the anemone buttercup, found only in Kosciuszko National Park.

    • Biodiversity survey The biodiversity survey school excursion in Kosciuszko National Park for Stage 4 (Years 7-8) students focuses on science. Investigate what 'biodiversity' means and use field equipment to assess the biodiversity of sample quadrats along a transect in the montane forest.
    • Biodiversity survey The biodiversity survey school excursion in Kosciuszko National Park for Stage 5 (Years 9-10) students focuses on science. Investigate what 'biodiversity' means and use field equipment to assess the biodiversity of sample quadrats along a transect in the montane forest.
    • Going up the mountain Going up the mountain is a school excursion in Kosciuszko National Park for Stage 6 (Years 11-12) students focusing on Geography. Students will use field work to record and compare the geology, weather, native plants, animals, human use and sustainability of the montane, sub-alpine and alpine ecosystems.
    • Kosciuszko - a special place Kosciuszko a special place is a presentation for stage 6 (year 11-12) students focusing on Geography. This excursion highlights the unique natural and cultural features of Kosciuszko National Park, interaction of the four spheres, human impacts, sustainability and park management. Students have the opportunity to have their questions answered by an NPWS education officer.
    • Main Range walk Intrepid hikers can tackle the challenging Main Range walk, which takes in glacial lakes, historic huts, and the summit of Mount Kosciuszko, across alpine high country in Kosciuszko National Park.
    • Muzzlewood track Muzzlewood track is a summer mountain bike trail between Thredbo Diggings campground and Bullocks Flat, in Kosciuszko National Park. It’s popular with experienced riders, and is easily combined with Thredbo Valley track.
    • Water in the world - protecting an alpine catchment Water in the world - protecting an alpine catchment is a school excursion in Kosciuszko National Park for Stage 4 (Years 7-8) geography students. Learn about the management of water quality at a ski resort and the importance of protected catchments in this area.
    • WilderQuest WildThings Come on a WilderQuest WildThings excursion to explore the forest and alpine grasslands. Designed for Stage 1 students and focusing on science and technology, investigate the living world in this part of Kosciuszko National Park, home to amazing plants and animals.
    • WilderQuest WildTracker Come on a WilderQuest WildTracker excursion designed for Stage 2 students focusing on science and technology. Carry out investigations to explore the living world in Kosciuszko National Park.
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    World-class wilderness

    Blue Lake, on Main Range walk in Kosciuszko National Park. Photo: E Sheargold/OEH

    In recognition of Kosciuszko's unique value as a conservation area, it's been named a UNESCO Biosphere Reserve. More than half of the area of the park, over 350,000ha, has been declared wilderness, including the rugged Western Fall wilderness of the Main Range. It also contains Blue Lake, a rare cirque lake formed by the head of a glacier. Blue Lake is a listed  Ramsar site, recognised for the role it plays in preserving rare and threatened species. The Australian Alps received National Heritage recognition in 2008, and were named one of Australia's National Landscapes.

    • Schlink Hut walking track Schlink Hut walking track is a high alpine hiking or mountain biking adventure near Perisher, visiting 3 historic huts in Kosciuszko National Park. Winter access is by snowshoe or cross-country skiing only.

    Plants and animals you may see

    Animals

    • Common wombat. Photo: Ingo Oeland

      Common wombat (Vombatus ursinus)

      A large, squat marsupial, the Australian common wombat is a burrowing mammal found in coastal forests and mountain ranges across NSW and Victoria. The only other remaining species of wombat in NSW, the endangered southern hairy-nosed wombat, was considered extinct until relatively recently.

    • Emu, Paroo Darling National Park. Photo: John Spencer

      Emu (Dromaius novaehollandiae)

      The largest of Australian birds, the emu stands up to 2m high and is the second largest bird in the world, after the ostrich. Emus live in pairs or family groups. The male emu incubates and rears the young, which will stay with the adult emus for up to 2 years.

    • Platypus climbing on to a submerged tree branch. Photo: Sharon Wormleaton/OEH

      Platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus)

      One of the most fascinating and unusual Australian animals, the duck-billed platypus, along with the echidna, are the only known monotremes, or egg-laying mammals, in existence. The platypus is generally found in permanent river systems and lakes in southern and eastern NSW and east and west of the Great Dividing Range.

    • Brush tail possum. Photo: Ken Stepnell

      Common brushtail possum (Trichosurus vulpecula)

      One of the most widespread of Australian tree-dwelling marsupials, the common brushtail possum is found across most of NSW in woodlands, rainforests and urban areas. With strong claws, a prehensile tail and opposable digits, these native Australian animals are well-adapted for life amongst the trees.

    • Eastern common ringtail possum. Photo: Ken Stepnell

      Common ringtail possum (Pseudocheirus peregrinus)

      Commonly found in forests, woodlands and leafy gardens across eastern NSW, the Australian ringtail possum is a tree-dwelling marsupial. With a powerful tail perfectly adapted to grasp objects, it forages in trees for eucalypt leaves, flowers and fruit.

    • Short-beaked echidna in Ben Boyd National Park. Photo: Sharon Wormleaton/OEH

      Short-beaked echidna (Tachyglossus aculeatus)

      One of only 2 egg-laying mammals in the world, the short-beaked echidna is one of the most widespread of Australian native animals. Covered in spines, or quills, they’re equipped with a keen sense of smell and a tube-like snout which they use to break apart termite mounds in search of ants.

    • Wedge-tailed eagle. Photo: Kelly Nowak

      Wedge-tailed eagle (Aquila audax)

      With a wingspan of up to 2.5m, the wedge-tailed eagle is Australia’s largest bird of prey. These Australian animals are found in woodlands across NSW, and have the ability to soar to heights of over 2km. If you’re bird watching, look out for the distinctive diamond-shaped tail of the eagle.

    Plants

    • Billy Button flowers at Peery Lake picnic area. Photo: Dinitee Haskard OEH

      Billy buttons (Craspedia spp. )

      Billy buttons are attractive Australian native plants that are widespread throughout eastern NSW in dry forest, grassland and alpine regions such as Kosciuszko National Park. The golden-yellow globe-shaped flowers are also known as woollyheads. Related to the daisy, billy buttons are an erect herb growing to a height of 50cm.

    Environments in this area

    School excursions (28)

    What we're doing

    Thredbo-Perisher area has management strategies in place to protect and conserve the values of this park. Visit the OEH website for detailed park and fire management documents. Here is just some of the work we’re doing to conserve these values:

    Understanding landscapes and geology

    Geo conservation efforts play an important role in protecting the delicate ecosystems of Kosciuszko National Park's fragile alpine landscapes. Rehabilitation and maintenance works to limit the impact of erosion and degradation, and monitoring the effects of climate change and visitation, are ongoing.

    Conservation program

    Snowy Mountains rehabilitation program

    The Snowy Mountains rehabilitation program addresses the environmental damage in Kosciuszko National Park caused during construction of the Snowy Mountains Hydro-Electric Scheme. Now in operation for more than a decade, the program’s remarkable results include a million new plantings, the removal of hazardous materials, and the revegetation of entire areas.

    Preserving biodiversity

    Kosciuszko National Park plays an important role in conserving NSW's biodiversity by protecting its vulnerable, threatened and endangered species. Conservation activities, such as the southern corroboree frog and mountain pygmy-possum conservation programs, are carried out in the Thredbo-Perisher area. These activities include monitoring species' habitats, distribution and population.

    Conservation program

    BioNet

    Uniting technology with the vast collection of information on biodiversity in NSW, BioNet is a valuable database open to any user. From individual plant sightings to detailed scientific surveys, it offers a wealth of knowledge about ecology and threatened species in NSW. 

    Managing weeds, pest animals and other threats

    Pests and weeds have a significant impact on the ecosystems and habitats within the Thredbo-Perisher area of Kosciuszko National Park. Reduction of pest species, such as deer and goats, is an important part of the work NSW National Parks and Wildlife Service (NPWS) does to protect the integrity of wilderness areas, water, and important biodiversity.

    Conservation program

    Hawkweed eradication program

    Orange and mouse-ear hawkweed are highly invasive weeds in Kosciuszko National Park. Small infestations of both species in the park's sensitive alpine and sub-alpine environments, and of orange hawkweed in nearby grazing land, threaten Australian native plants, biodiversity and agriculture.

    Historic heritage in our parks and reserves

    The historic heritage of Kosciuszko National Park is preserved through a variety of NPWS programs that embrace its past. Heritage revitalisation and adaptive reuse projects, such as Bullocks Hut, are ongoing in this area of the park.

    Conservation program

    Historic and cultural heritage volunteering program

    Are you a history buff longing for an outlet? Have you ever considered volunteering as a guide to share local heritage with visitors to your area? NSW National Parks invites you to join us in helping to keep our state’s precious cultural and historic sites open to the public. Becoming a historic and cultural heritage volunteer will give you an opportunity to offer guided tours and share local history with visitors.

    Developing visitor facilities and experiences

    NPWS is committed to developing facilities for the enjoyment and safety of visitors in Kosciuszko National Park. Visitor feedback and environmental sustainability are key considerations in park maintenance, and upgrades are ongoing. Campgrounds, picnic areas, trails and lookouts are continually maintained and upgraded, and NPWS regularly reviews the park’s recreational opportunities, identifying areas for improvement or addition. Hazard assessments are also ongoing.

    Kosciuszko National Park has achieved Australia’s first Ecotourism Destination Certification, through Ecotourism Australia, recognising best practice sustainable tourism and visitation in protected areas.

    Managing fire

    NSW is one of the most bushfire prone areas in the world due to our climate, weather systems, vegetation and the rugged terrain. NPWS is committed to minimising the likelihood and impact of bushfires via a strategic program of fire research, fire planning, hazard reduction, highly trained rapid response firefighting crews and community alerts.

    Conservation program

    Hazard reduction program

    Managing fire-prone NSW national parks requires a three-pronged approach, including fire planning, community education, and fuel management. When it comes to fuel like dead wood, NPWS conducts planned hazard reduction activities like mowing and controlled burning to assist in the protection of life, property and community.

    Winter snow and snow gums in Kosciuszko National Park. Photo: John Spencer