NSW National Parks and Wildlife Service (NPWS) is the first national park agency in Australia to set a zero extinctions target, and one of the first in the world.

Around 85% of the approximately 900 threatened species in NSW are found in our protected parks and reserves. Find out what we're doing to ensure our parks are a permanent stronghold for threatened species conservation and recovery, and see how you can help.

What we're doing

Scroll or swipe to see what we're doing to ensure the conservation and recovery of threatened species in our parks.

Big name, big aims

Over 250 Assets of Intergenerational Significance (AIS) areas have been declared in our parks as home to the most threatened animal and plant habitat, giving them extra legal protections.

Sleeping pygmy possum clutching tightly on to finger. Photo: Janet Mayer © Janet Mayer
Sleeping pygmy possum clutching tightly on to finger. Photo: Janet Mayer ©  Janet Mayer

Zero extinctions target

Just as we have a net zero emissions target, we now also have a target of zero extinctions of threatened species in our NSW national parks.

A northern corroboree frog is held in a gloved hand. Photo credit: Alex Pike © DPE
A northern corroboree frog is held in a gloved hand. Photo credit: Alex Pike © DPE

Feral predator-free areas

Find out more about our network of feral predator-free areas across NSW national parks that are helping to turn back the tide of native animal extinctions.

Red fox looking for food, Royal National Park. Photo: David Croft © DPE
Red fox looking for food, Royal National Park. Photo: David Croft © DPE

Saving our Species program

Saving our Species is the NSW Government's flagship threatened species program, and the biggest conservation commitment ever made in NSW.

Close up of two hooded plover chicks on a sandy beach. Photo: Jodie Dunn © Jodie Dunn
Close up of two hooded plover chicks on a sandy beach. Photo: Jodie Dunn © Jodie Dunn

Keeping score

National park performance scorecards is a world-leading ecological program that will track 8 NSW national park sites with Ecological Health Performance Scorecards.

Close-up image of a spotted-tailed quoll, also known as a tiger quoll. Photo: John Turbill/DPE
Close-up image of a spotted-tailed quoll, also known as a tiger quoll. Photo: John Turbill/DPE

New protected areas

Each year, NPWS acquires land for our parks system to include a wide variety of ecosystems, environments, plants and animals, and places important to people. This helps to protect biodiversity and cultural heritage

Wetland birds fly over Caryapundy Swamp, Narriearra Caryapundy Swamp National Park. Photo: Joshua Smith ©DPE
Wetland birds fly over Caryapundy Swamp, Narriearra Caryapundy Swamp National Park. Photo: Joshua Smith ©DPE

Weeds and pest animals

Invasive weeds and pest animal species threaten our native animals and plants and can harm the environment. Find out what we're doing to manage these threats, and how you can help.

The orange flower of the invasive hawkweed plant. Photo: Mark Hamilton © DPE
The orange flower of the invasive hawkweed plant. Photo: Mark Hamilton © DPE

Spotlight

Discover threatened species stories and experiences

Border Ranges 360 experiences

Discover some of the rare and remarkable animals, plants and habitats that make Border Ranges National Park special, with our interactive 360-degree experiences.

Profile view of a rufous scrub-bird (Atrichornis rufescens) standing on a mossy rock. Glen Trelfo © Glen Trelfo
Profile view of a rufous scrub-bird (Atrichornis rufescens) standing on a mossy rock. Glen Trelfo © Glen Trelfo

Rock-wallaby livestream

View our livestream camera and get up close to threatened brush-tailed rock-wallabies in Oxley Wild Rivers National Park.

Three brush-tailed rock-wallabies blend into their rocky habitat in Oxley Wild Rivers National Park. Photo: Shane Ruming © Shane Ruming
Three brush-tailed rock-wallabies blend into their rocky habitat in Oxley Wild Rivers National Park. Photo: Shane Ruming © Shane Ruming

A living fossil

The incredible Wollemi pine has been around for over 90 million years. This 'living fossil' is one of the world's oldest and rarest plants. With less than 50 adult trees known to exist in the wild, it's protected as an Asset of Intergenerational Significance.

Female seed cone of the critically endangered Wollemi pine tree. Photo: Jaime Plaza © Botanic Gardens Trust
Female seed cone of the critically endangered Wollemi pine tree. Photo: Jaime Plaza © Botanic Gardens Trust

Let me (re)introduce you

Australia has the worst mammal extinction record in the world. By establishing feral predator-free areas we're working to reduce the extinction risk for 33 locally extinct species, including the bilby, and help secure a further 45 existing threatened species.

A marsupial bilby under spotlight at night. Photo: Brad Leue/AWC © Brad Leue
A marsupial bilby under spotlight at night. Photo: Brad Leue/AWC © Brad Leue

More than a million species worldwide are threatened with extinction. Our protected areas provide vital refuge from the impacts of feral animals, altered fire regimes, climate change and other threats.

How you can help and learn more

Be part of Saving our Species

Sign up for news, report sightings, or volunteer. See some of the ways you can make a difference and be part of Saving our Species (SoS).

Close up of a group of people with binoculars at Warrumbungle National Park. Photo: Simone Cottrell © Simone Cottrell & DPE
Close up of a group of people with binoculars at Warrumbungle National Park. Photo: Simone Cottrell © Simone Cottrell & DPE

Care for parks

From treading lightly or helping injured wildlife, to reducing the impact of feral animals and weeds, find out how you can care for our parks during your visit.

Ranger surveying animal footprints, Mungo National Park. Photo: John Spencer © DPE
Ranger surveying animal footprints, Mungo National Park. Photo: John Spencer © DPE

Volunteer with us

Volunteer for NSW National Parks’ threatened species projects and make a real difference to the future of our Australian animals, birds and plants.

Close up of white gloved hands holding lantana, an invasive weed species. Photo: Rosie Nicolai © Rosie Nicolai
Close up of white gloved hands holding lantana, an invasive weed species. Photo: Rosie Nicolai © Rosie Nicolai

Careers with us

We employ a range of dedicated people across NSW, including park rangers, field officers, scientists, subject experts and administration staff.

A ranger surveying Macquarie Marshes. Photo: John Spencer © DPE
A ranger surveying Macquarie Marshes. Photo: John Spencer © DPE

Visit our parks

Learn more about NSW national parks' biodiversity by exploring our many amazing parks and nature reserves. Remember to be mindful of native wildlife and habitat when visiting.

A couple look up at tall rainforest trees in Barrington Tops. Photo: Robert Mulally/OEH
A couple look up at tall rainforest trees in Barrington Tops. Photo: Robert Mulally/OEH

Threatened Species Day activities

National Threatened Species Day is commemorated on 7 September every year, to raise awareness of plants and animals at risk of extinction.

Close up of the small pink-mauve flower of the endangered sand doubletail orchid. Photo credit: Barry Collier © Barry Collier
Close up of the small pink-mauve flower of the endangered sand doubletail orchid. Photo credit: Barry Collier © Barry Collier

Join Frog ID Week

Join the growing number of citizen scientists during Australia's FrogID Week, held every November.

Looking down at a threatened green and golden bell frog sitting on a strawberry plant leaf. Photo credit: Stuart Cohen ©: Stuart Cohen and OEH
Looking down at a threatened green and golden bell frog sitting on a strawberry plant leaf. Photo credit: Stuart Cohen ©: Stuart Cohen and OEH

Join Global Big Day

Global Big Day is one of the worlds largest birdwatching and citizen science challenges. It takes place over 24 hours on a single day in May.

Two regent honeyeater birds perch on a tree in Capertee National Park. Photo: Mick Roderick © Mick Roderick
Two regent honeyeater birds perch on a tree in Capertee National Park. Photo: Mick Roderick © Mick Roderick

Meet some of our threatened species

Front-on view of a spotted tree frog on a rock. Photo: Dave Hunter © Dave Hunter
Front-on view of a spotted tree frog on a rock. Photo: Dave Hunter © Dave Hunter
The sun shines through rainforest onto the leaves of an endangered nightcap oak. Photo: Justin Mallee ©: Justin Mallee
The sun shines through rainforest onto the leaves of an endangered nightcap oak. Photo: Justin Mallee ©: Justin Mallee
Close up of a regent honeyeater bird perched on a tree branch. Photo: Mick Roderick © Mick Roderick
Close up of a regent honeyeater bird perched on a tree branch. Photo: Mick Roderick © Mick Roderick
Close up of the head and chest of a grey grasswren with a fly on its its breast. Photo: Jeff Hardy/DPE © Jeff Hardy
Close up of the head and chest of a grey grasswren with a fly on its its breast. Photo: Jeff Hardy/DPE © Jeff Hardy
A brush-tailed rock-wallaby blends into its rocky surrounds in Oxley Wild Rivers National Park. Photo: John Spencer © DPE
A brush-tailed rock-wallaby blends into its rocky surrounds in Oxley Wild Rivers National Park. Photo: John Spencer © DPE
Profile view of an eastern bristlebird on the ground amongst grassy habitat, it's beak open during birdsong. Photo: Leo Berzins © Leo Berzins
Profile view of an eastern bristlebird on the ground amongst grassy habitat, it's beak open during birdsong. Photo: Leo Berzins © Leo Berzins
Profile view of a Fleay's barred frog on a rock surrounded by leaf litter. Photo: Peter Higgins © DPE
Profile view of a Fleay's barred frog on a rock surrounded by leaf litter. Photo: Peter Higgins © DPE
A courting pair of Gould's petrels, Cabbage Tree Island. Photo: Nicholas Carlile © DPIE
A courting pair of Gould's petrels, Cabbage Tree Island. Photo: Nicholas Carlile © DPIE
Profile view of a grey-headed flying-fox flying past eucalupt trees. Photo: Shane Ruming © Shane Ruming
Profile view of a grey-headed flying-fox flying past eucalupt trees. Photo: Shane Ruming © Shane Ruming
An adult Guthega skink walks along a granite rock, with alpine grass in the background. Photo credit: Mel Schroder © DPE
An adult Guthega skink walks along a granite rock, with alpine grass in the background. Photo credit: Mel Schroder © DPE
A Mount Kaputar skink suns itself on rocks in Mount Kaputar National Park. Photo: Jodi Rowley © Jodi Rowley
A Mount Kaputar skink suns itself on rocks in Mount Kaputar National Park. Photo: Jodi Rowley © Jodi Rowley
Koala. Photo: Lucy Morrell
Koala. Photo: Lucy Morrell
Mountain pygmy possum, Kosciuszko National Park. Photo: Linda Broome ©DPIE
Mountain pygmy possum, Kosciuszko National Park. Photo: Linda Broome ©DPIE
Profile view of a rufous scrub-bird (Atrichornis rufescens) standing on a mossy rock. Glen Trelfo © Glen Trelfo
Profile view of a rufous scrub-bird (Atrichornis rufescens) standing on a mossy rock. Glen Trelfo © Glen Trelfo
Southern corroboree frog (Pseudophryne corroboree), Kosciuszko National Park. Photo: John Spencer
Southern corroboree frog (Pseudophryne corroboree), Kosciuszko National Park. Photo: John Spencer
Female seed cone of the critically endangered Wollemi pine tree. Photo: Jaime Plaza © Botanic Gardens Trust
Female seed cone of the critically endangered Wollemi pine tree. Photo: Jaime Plaza © Botanic Gardens Trust
An eastern ground parrot bird's green and yellow colouring camouflages it amongst grassland. Photo: Lachlan Hall © Lachlan Hall
An eastern ground parrot bird's green and yellow colouring camouflages it amongst grassland. Photo: Lachlan Hall © Lachlan Hall
A spotted-tailed quoll walks across a moss-covered forest floor at night. Photo: Lachlan Hall © Lachlan Hall
A spotted-tailed quoll walks across a moss-covered forest floor at night. Photo: Lachlan Hall © Lachlan Hall
Profile view of an Albert's lyrebird looking for insects amongst leaf litter on the forest floor. Photo: Gavin Phillips © Gavin Phillips
Profile view of an Albert's lyrebird looking for insects amongst leaf litter on the forest floor. Photo: Gavin Phillips © Gavin Phillips
Australian fur seals, Montague Island Nature Reserve. Photo: OEH
Australian fur seals, Montague Island Nature Reserve. Photo: OEH
Nodding geebung. Photo: Michael Cufer ©DPIE
Nodding geebung. Photo: Michael Cufer ©DPIE
Profile view of a wompoo fruit-dove on a tree branch with red berries. Photo: John Turbill © John Turbill
Profile view of a wompoo fruit-dove on a tree branch with red berries. Photo: John Turbill © John Turbill