Back to previous page
Print factsheet

Berowra Valley National Park

Learn more

Learn more about why this park is special

Berowra Valley National Park is a special place. Here are just some of the reasons why:

Wonderful waterways

Barnetts lookout, Berowra Valley National Park. Photo: John Yurasek

Berowra Creek is a hidden waterway perfect for canoeing, boating and fishing. Escape the noise and traffic of the city and come and while away a few hours in the perfect serenity of this lovely little spot. Load up your pack with sandwiches and hats and take the family for a wander along the trails or laze under a tree at Crosslands Reserve while the kids play.

What we're doing for Visitor facilities and experiences in this park

Making tracks

Great North walk, Berowra Valley National Park. Photo: Nick Cubbin

Great North walk is an iconic track that stretches 250km from Sydney to Newcastle. Constructed in 1988 as part of the Australian Bicentenary, the walk takes in diverse landscapes and a lot of Australian history. Part of the walk travels through Berowra Valley National Park along the Benowie walking track.

  • Bellamy fire trail Bellamy fire trail is a northern Sydney secret. This short walk through Berowra Valley Regional Park connects Pennant Hills and Thornleigh along a dog-friendly bushland trail.

Bush in the 'burbs

Berowra Valley National Park. Photo: Nick Cubbin

Eucalypt forests, delightful birdlife and all manner of creatures occupy this very beautiful bush valley stretching from the suburbs out towards the Hawkesbury river. While you're in the park, keep your eye out for a powerful owl, sea eagle, wedgetail, or listen for the call of a red crown toadlet.

What we're doing for Biodiversity in this park

Aboriginal importance

Barnetts lookout, Berowra Valley National Park. Photo: John Yurasek

Berowra Valley National Park is within the traditional Country of the Guringai People to the east of Berowra Creek and the Dharug People to the west. It contains a number of significant Aboriginal heritage sites, including artefacts, middens and campfire sites. This special area, with its land and waterways, plants and animals, features in all facets of Aboriginal culture and continues to be of great significance to Aboriginal people today.

What we're doing for Aboriginal culture in this park

Plants and animals you may see

Animals

  • Grey headed flying fox hanging from a tree branch. Photo: Shane Ruming/OEH

    Grey-headed flying fox (Pteropus poliocephalus)

    The grey-headed flying fox is one of several threatened Australian animals and the largest Australian native bat, with a wingspan that extends up to 1m. Known to inhabit woodlands, rainforests and urban regions, these fascinating nocturnal mammals congregate in large roost sites along the east coast of NSW.

  • Closeup of a laughing kookaburra's head and body. Photo: Rosie Nicolai/OEH

    Kookaburra (Dacelo novaeguineae)

    Of the 2 species of kookaburra found in Australia, the laughing kookaburra is the best-known and the largest of the native kingfishers. With its distinctive riotous call, the laughing kookaburra is commonly heard in open woodlands and forests throughout NSW national parks, making these ideal spots for bird watching.

  •  Superb lyrebird, Minnamurra Rainforest, Budderoo National Park. Photo: David Finnegan

    Superb lyrebird (Menura novaehollandiae)

    With a complex mimicking call and an elaborate courtship dance to match, the superb lyrebird is one of the most spectacular Australian animals. A bird watching must-see, the superb lyrebird can be found in rainforests and wet woodlands across eastern NSW and Victoria.

  • Swamp wallaby in Murramarang National Park. Photo: David Finnegan

    Swamp wallaby (Wallabia bicolor)

    The swamp wallaby, also known as the black wallaby or black pademelon, lives in the dense understorey of rainforests, woodlands and dry sclerophyll forest along eastern Australia. This unique Australian macropod has a dark black-grey coat with a distinctive light-coloured cheek stripe.

Plants

  • Old man banksia, Moreton National Park. Photo: John Yurasek

    Old man banksia (Banksia serrata)

    Hardy Australian native plants, old man banksias can be found along the coast, and in the dry sclerophyll forests and sandstone mountain ranges of NSW. With roughened bark and gnarled limbs, they produce a distinctive cylindrical yellow-green banksia flower which blossoms from summer to early autumn.

Look out for...

Grey-headed flying fox

Pteropus poliocephalus

Grey headed flying fox hanging from a tree branch. Photo: Shane Ruming/OEH

The grey-headed flying fox is one of several threatened Australian animals and the largest Australian native bat, with a wingspan that extends up to 1m. Known to inhabit woodlands, rainforests and urban regions, these fascinating nocturnal mammals congregate in large roost sites along the east coast of NSW.

Environments in this park

Education resources (1)

Naturescapes e‑newsletter

Subscribe to Naturescapes

Get the latest news from NSW National Parks

View of Berowra Valley creek. Photo: John Yurasek