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Second Ponds Creek walk

Rouse Hill Regional Park

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Learn more about why this park is special

Second Ponds Creek walk is in Rouse Hill Regional Park. Here are just some of the reasons why this park is special:

Beautiful venue

Fibrosa Pavillion, Rouse Hill Regional Park. Photo: John Yurasek

If you're looking for a memorable location for your wedding or special event, think about hiring the Crebra or Fibrosa Pavilions. These fabulous open pavilions sit strikingly in the landscape, allowing your guests to enjoy the surroundings while being sheltered from the elements. Every weekend Rouse Hill Regional Park is full of the sounds of families enjoying themselves riding bikes around the trails, clambering about the adventure playground, enjoying a kids' party at the barbecues and taking the dog for a walk. There's plenty of room to stretch your legs in the wide open spaces; once the paddocks of Rouse Hill House.

  • Fibrosa and Crebra Pavilions Fibrosa and Crebra Pavilions are great locations for a family celebration or birthday party. Perfect for small or large gatherings, there are picnic tables and barbecues surrounded by green space.
  • Rouse Hill picnic area and playground Dog-friendly Rouse Hill Regional Park is a great day out – enjoy a barbecue, walk or bike ride and let the kids explore the playground. It’s great for a birthday party.

Woodland surrounds

Ironbark Ridge, Rouse Hill Regional Park. Photo: John Yurasek

Angophora species such as broad-leaved apple trees and eucalypt varieties like grey box and forest red gum are prevalent throughout Cumberland Plain woodland, supported by Rouse Hill Regional Park. Other endangered ecological communities found in the area include shale sandstone transition forest and Sydney coastal river-flat forest. Rouse Hill Regional Park is also a significant home to local endangered microbats, such as the fishing bat.

  • Second Ponds Creek walk Go for a bike ride or take your dog for a walk along the short Second Ponds Creek walk in Rouse Hill Regional Park. It’s a great way to start or finish to your picnic.

Plants and animals you may see

Animals

  • Brush tail possum. Photo: Ken Stepnell

    Common brushtail possum (Trichosurus vulpecula)

    One of the most widespread of Australian tree-dwelling marsupials, the common brushtail possum is found across most of NSW in woodlands, rainforests and urban areas. With strong claws, a prehensile tail and opposable digits, these native Australian animals are well-adapted for life amongst the trees.

  • Tawny frogmouth. Photo: Rosie Nicolai

    Tawny frogmouth (Podargus strigoides)

    Found throughout Australia, the tawny frogmouth is often mistaken for an owl due to its wide, powerful beak, large head and nocturnal hunting habits. The ‘oom oom oom’ call of this native bird can be heard echoing throughout a range of habitats including heath, woodlands and urban areas.

  • Superb fairy wren. Photo: Ingo Oeland

    Superb fairy wren (Malurus cyaneus)

    The striking blue and black plumage of the adult male superb fairy wren makes for colourful bird watching across south-eastern Australia. The sociable superb fairy wrens, or blue wrens, are Australian birds living in groups consisting of a dominant male, mouse-brown female ‘jenny wrens’ and several tawny-brown juveniles.

Look out for...

Superb fairy wren

Malurus cyaneus

Superb fairy wren. Photo: Ingo Oeland

The striking blue and black plumage of the adult male superb fairy wren makes for colourful bird watching across south-eastern Australia. The sociable superb fairy wrens, or blue wrens, are Australian birds living in groups consisting of a dominant male, mouse-brown female ‘jenny wrens’ and several tawny-brown juveniles.

Environments in this park

Education resources (1)

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Second Ponds Creek Walk, Rouse Hill Regional Park. Photo: John Yurasek