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End Peak walking track

Ulidarra National Park

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Learn more about why this park is special

End Peak walking track is in Ulidarra National Park. Here are just some of the reasons why this park is special:

Land of Gumbaynggir

Forest, Ulidarra National Park. Photo: Rob Cleary/Seen Australia

As you explore the remote bushland and admire the unspoilt beauty of Ulidarra National Park, you'll be walking on the traditional lands of the Gumbaynggirr People. The park is part of a larger 'men's area' and was once used for hunting and gathering of bush foods and medicines. The area continues to have special significance for Gumbaynggirr people as it connects them with their Dreamtime stories.

Mid North Coast menagerie

Forest, Ulidarra National Park. Photo: Rob Cleary

Along with the adjoining Bruxner Park Flora Reserve, Ulidarra provides important habitats for a diverse range of wildlife, including koalas, masked owls, dingoes and little bent-wing bats. Some 232 native vertebrate species make this beautiful place their home, including 40 different mammals, reptiles, frogs and fish. If you're lucky, you might spot threatened species such as Stephens banded snakes, yellow-bellied gliders and powerful owls. There are also 125 different bird species found in Ulidarra, making it a haven for birdwatching. Amongst the myriad of birds you'll find here, you might catch a glimpse of threatened species such as glossy black-cockatoos, brown tree-creepers, barred cuckoo-shrikes, black bitterns, barking owls, powerful owls, wompoo fruit-doves and rose-crowned fruit-doves.

  • End Peak walking track End Peak walking track is a challenging walk that offers rewarding panoramic views of Coffs Harbour from Ulidarra National Park’s highest point. It’s great for birdwatching and for a picnic with a vie...

Park of the people

Forest trail, Ulidarra National Park. Photo: Rob Cleary/Seen Australia

From the early 1880s, Ulidarra National Park and the adjoining Bruxner Park Flora Reserve were used for logging. Throughout the park, you might come across tree stumps that bear the scars of board cuts, a style of tree felling that took place up until the early 1950s. Starting in the early 1930s, local community lobbying for the protection of these areas has seen the protection of Bruxner in 1933, the establishment of Bruxner Park Flora Reserve in 1958, and later the establishment of Ulidarra and nearby Bindarri National Park in 1999.

Precious plant life

Rainforest creek, Ulidarra National Park. Photo: Rob Cleary/Seen Australia

Ulidarra National Park provides an important link between the hinterland and plateau habitats of the World Heritage-listed Dorrigo National Park, connecting the mountain ranges of Tuckers Nob in Bindarri National Park to the coastal habitats of Moonee Beach Nature Reserve and Coffs Coast Regional Park. The park conserves rare lowland rainforest, with species such as red carabeen, booyong and bangalow palms. You'll also find old growth sclerophyll forest with coastal blackbutt and turpentine trees, and small areas of wet sclerophyll forest dominated by brushbox.

  • End Peak walking track End Peak walking track is a challenging walk that offers rewarding panoramic views of Coffs Harbour from Ulidarra National Park’s highest point. It’s great for birdwatching and for a picnic with a vie...

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End Peak walking track, Ulidarra National Park. Photo: Rob Cleary