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Dasyurus picnic area

Monga National Park

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Learn more about why this park is special

Dasyurus picnic area is in Monga National Park. Here are just some of the reasons why this park is special:

A glimpse of trading history

Mongarlowe River picnic area, Monga National Park. Photo: Lucas Boyd

Monga National Park is significant for its natural wonders and its historic heritage. Corn Trail walking track, which is today enjoyed by bushwalkers and horse riders, was the first trade route between the Buckenbowra Valley farmlands near the coast and the early European settlements on the tablelands near Braidwood. Further settlement came to the area in the 1840s, with the establishment of the timber trade and gold mining. The sawmill at Monga provided timber for Braidwood and the establishment of Canberra in the 1900s, with logging continuing in the area until 1987.

  • Corn Trail walking track Corn Trail walking track is a historic trail for hikers and horse riders to traverse a wide variety of landscapes and follow in the footsteps of the past.

Aboriginal culture

Mongarlowe River, Dasyurus picnic area, Monga National Park. Photo: Lucas Boyd

For over 14,000 years, the Yuin and Walbunja people have lived around the valleys of Clyde, Deua and Buckenbowra rivers. Walkers and horse riders can walk in their footsteps on Corn Trail walking track, which was one of the trails used by Aboriginal people to travel between the coast and the tablelands. There are many Aboriginal cultural sites in the park where stone artefacts, fire beacons and old campsites have been found.

Unique plantlife

Sunlight through the tree canopy in Monga National Park. Photo Lucas Boyd © DPIE

Many of the plants you'll find in the cool, temperate rainforests of Monga are millions of years in the making. Related to the plants from the super continent Gondwana, they present a unique window to the past. The plumwood trees and soft tree ferns you see in the park are closely related to pollen fossils found in Antarctica. Some plumwood trees here have widths of up to 4m and are thought to be thousands of years old. Wander along the banks of Mongarlowe River and you'll also see the distinctive bright red flowers of the Monga waratah.

  • Dasyurus picnic area Dasyurus picnic area is a tranquil spot to stop on your drive to the coast from Canberra or a great day trip from Batemans Bay or Braidwood.
  • Mongarlowe River picnic area Under the shade of eucalypt forest, this sheltered picnic site is an ideal place to start exploring Monga's rich habitats with easy strolls, swimming, and birdwatching.

Plants and animals protected in this park

Animals

  • Echidna. Photo: Ken Stepnell

    Short-beaked echidna (Tachyglossus aculeatus)

    One of only 2 egg-laying mammals in the world, the short-beaked echidna is one of the most widespread of Australian native animals. Covered in spines, or quills, they’re equipped with a keen sense of smell and a tube-like snout which they use to break apart termite mounds in search of ants.

  • A juvenile platypus saved by National Parks and Wildlife staff. Photo: M Bannerman/OEH

    Platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus)

    One of the most fascinating and unusual Australian animals, the duck-billed platypus, along with the echidna, are the only known monotremes, or egg-laying mammals, in existence. The platypus is generally found in permanent river systems and lakes in southern and eastern NSW and east and west of the Great Dividing Range.

  • Profile view of a grey-headed flying-fox flying past eucalupt trees. Photo: Shane Ruming © Shane Ruming

    Grey-headed flying-fox (Pteropus poliocephalus)

    The grey-headed flying fox is Australia's largest native bat, with a wingspan up to 1m. This threatened species travels up and down south-eastern Australia and plays a vital role in pollinating plants and spreading seeds in our native forests.

  • A spotted-tailed quoll walks across a moss-covered forest floor at night. Photo: Lachlan Hall © Lachlan Hall

    Spotted-tailed quoll (Dasyurus maculatus)

    The spotted-tailed quoll is the largest remaining carnivorous marsupial on the Australian mainland. It’s protected as a vulnerable species in NSW.

Plants

  • Close up photo of a waratah flower, Blue Mountains National Park. Photo: Simone Cottrell/OEH.

    Waratah (Telopea speciosissima)

    The beautiful waratah is not only the NSW floral emblem, it's also one of the best-known Australian native plants. This iconic Australian bush flower can be found on sandstone ridges around Sydney, in nearby mountain ranges and on the NSW South Coast. The waratah has a vibrant crimson flowerhead, measuring up to 15cm across, and blossoms in spring.

Look out for...

Waratah

Telopea speciosissima

Close up photo of a waratah flower, Blue Mountains National Park. Photo: Simone Cottrell/OEH.

The beautiful waratah is not only the NSW floral emblem, it's also one of the best-known Australian native plants. This iconic Australian bush flower can be found on sandstone ridges around Sydney, in nearby mountain ranges and on the NSW South Coast. The waratah has a vibrant crimson flowerhead, measuring up to 15cm across, and blossoms in spring.

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