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Torrington State Conservation Area

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Learn more about why this park is special

Torrington State Conservation Area is a special place. Here are just some of the reasons why:

Mining heritage

Trees along the back of a creek, Torrington State Conservation Area. Photo: OEH

Go back in time to the by-gone era of mining on the Mole Tableland when hopefuls came from as far as England and China to explore the deposits of tin and other minerals. At its peak in the 1920s, Torrington and nearby villages swelled to accommodate around 600 miners, but sharply declined in 1946 when mining virtually stopped. Try your luck fossicking for semi-precious gemstones like beryl, emerald, topaz and quartz.

Land of Dreaming

Water hole, Torrington State Conservation Area. Photo: OEH

Torrington State Conservation Area is a significant place for the Ngarrabul, Marbul, Bigambul and Jucumbul people. The land and waterways of Torrington, and the plants and animals that live in them, feature in all facets of Aboriginal culture and are associated with dreaming stories told to this day.

Fabulous flowers and wonderful wildlife

Wattle (Acacia pycnantha), Torrington State Conservation Area. Photo: OEH

This area is home to over 750 plant species, including 45 rare or threatened species like the rare Beadle’s grevillia and Torrington wattle. In fact, some plant communities thrive in the sedge-heath swamps and mole granite outcrops and can’t be found anywhere else in the world. From September to March the bush is ablaze with colour for the spectacular wildflower display. The unique climatic conditions make Torrington a haven for Australian wildlife. It’s home to 20 mammal, 135 bird, 29 reptile and 13 frog species, including threatened species like the powerful owl and the tiger quoll. You’ll probably see grey kangaroos and wallabies in the distance, and kookaburras and currawongs in the trees overhead. But if you’re lucky, you might also spot rare birds like the striking turquoise parrot and rare regent honeyeater.

  • Mystery Face walking track The magnificent rock formations on the Mystery Face walking track are a must-see for any Torrington visitor and great for birdwatching and springtime wildflower displays.
  • Ugly Corner Falls walking track The Ugly Corner Falls walking track is a fantastic way to get back to nature and experience the unique plants and animals of Torrington.

Bush experiences

Picnic area, Torrington State Conservation Area. Photo: OEH

Take in the dramatic views, magnificent rock formations and stunning wildflowers on the many walking tracks. Set up camp at Blatherarm campground or just spend an afternoon relaxing and picnicking at the various picnic areas. And if you are an experienced bushwalker looking for adventure, why not go exploring by foot into the remote corners in the north.

  • Mystery Face walking track The magnificent rock formations on the Mystery Face walking track are a must-see for any Torrington visitor and great for birdwatching and springtime wildflower displays.
  • Thunderbolts lookout walking track Follow this walking track to see the spectacular 360° panoramic views of Torrington at Thunderbolts lookout. Experience the stunning wildflowers along the way.

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Thunderbolts lookout, Torrington State Conservation Area. Photo: NSW Government