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Coonabarabran - Baradine - Warrumbungle drive

Warrumbungle National Park

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Overview

Explore the spectacular landscapes, historic towns, picnic spots and walks of the Warrumbungles and Pilliga, near Coonabarabran and Baradine, in NSW.

Where
Warrumbungle National Park
Distance
140km loop
Time suggested
5hrs
Price
Free
Entry fees

Park entry fees apply in Warrumbungle National Park

Please note

Coonabarabran-Baradine-Warrumbungle drive is a 130km scenic driving route in western NSW. It's a great way to discover the history, towns and natural wonders of Warrumbungle National Park and Pilliga Forest at your own pace.

Setting out from Coonabarabran, known as the 'Astronomy Capital of Australia' or 'Coona', head towards Baradine. Here a visit to the Pilliga Forest Discovery Centre is a must, then find out more about the Aboriginal history of the area at the Baradine Local Land Council Building. There are lots of Aboriginal artefacts, like emu callers, rain sticks, clapsticks and didgeridoos to name a few. A meal at the historic Tattersalls Hotel might be on the cards, and afterwards you could take a detour to the award-winning Sculptures in the Scrub walking track in the Pilliga Forest.

Last stop on the driving tour is Warrumbungle National Park, where your adventure has really just begun. Stretch your legs on a walk to take in views of the amazing volcanic scenery, and camp under the stars. Make sure you check out the Siding Spring Observatory.

For directions, safety and practical information, see visitor info

 

Google Street View Trekker

Using Google Street View Trekker, we've captured imagery across a range of NSW national parks and attractions. Get a bird's eye view of these incredible landscapes before setting off on your own adventure.

Google Trekker at Cape Byron State Conservation Area. Photo: J Spencer/OEH.

Conservation program:

Warrumbungle National Park after-fire program

The bushfires that ravaged Warrumbungle National Park in 2013 became the focus of a major research and recovery program by NSW National Parks. The program had multiple components including studies on fire behaviour, cultural heritage, soils and water, native Australian animals, vegetation and fire management, and included citizen science.

Views looking towards the Grand High Tops, Warrumbungle National Park. Photo: John Spencer

General enquiries

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Park info

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