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Towra Point Nature Reserve

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Learn more about why this park is special

Towra Point Nature Reserve is a special place. Here are just some of the reasons why:

Sights to behold

Quibrary Bay viewing platform, Towra Point Nature Reserve. Photo: John Spencer

Boating and kayaking through the maze of waterways is a great way to see Towra Point Nature Reserve. Be sure to stay within sanctuary and refuge zones to help preserve this outstanding environment. Towra Beach picnic area is a popular destination in summer with boaties, who are tempted by the views stretching from Botany Bay to Sans Souci.

  • Quibray Bay viewing platform Quibray Bay viewing platform in Kurnell is a great place for birdwatching and also features scenic views across conservation areas close to Sydney.
  • Towra Beach Kurnell’s delightful Towra Beach is ideal for boating, kayaking or a leisurely picnic, all with the Sydney city skyline as your backdrop.

Captain Cook’s landing

Towra Beach, Towra Point Nature Reserve. Photo: John Spencer

The site of one of the first contacts between European and Aboriginal peoples, Towra Point is a hugely important place for Australia as we know it today. In April 1770, the Cook expedition explored the area and mapped Towra Lagoon as a source of fresh water. Botany Bay was also the site of some of Australia's first botanical collections by Joseph Banks and Daniel Solander; much of what they saw can still be seen here today.

Aboriginal country

Quibrary Bay viewing platform, Towra Point Nature Reserve. Photo: John Spencer

The beautiful coastal landscape of Towra Point is country for various Dharawal, Dharug and Eora nations. It has provided an abundant source of natural food, being especially rich in seafood and fresh drinking water, for thousands of years. This nature reserve is now a dedicated Aboriginal Place, in recognition of the natural and spiritual significance to this remarkable civilisation. Aboriginal sites, including middens and earth mounds, are all a part of Towra’s fascinating historic landscape.

A bird watching haven

Water hole, Towra Point Nature Reserve. Photo: John Spencer

Some of the birds that feed on the intertidal flats around Towra Point migrate over 12,000km, coming from as far away as Siberia, China and Japan. Nearly all the migratory birds here are wading birds or shorebirds. You may spot a royal spoonbill or a Pacific golden plover when you visit the reserve; this is a great place for birdwatching and nature photography. Nearly all of the migratory birds that have used the Towra Point area are wading birds or shorebirds. Approximately 34 of the 80 species of migratory birds listed for protection have been recorded as using the Towra Point wetlands.

  • Quibray Bay viewing platform Quibray Bay viewing platform in Kurnell is a great place for birdwatching and also features scenic views across conservation areas close to Sydney.

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School excursions (1)

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Towra Point Nature Reserve. Photo: OEH