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Koonaburra National Park

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Learn more about why this area is special

Koonaburra National Park is a special place. Here are just some of the reasons why:

Sandplain and dune field country

Aerial view of Koonaburra National Park. Photo: Joshua Smith © DPE

Koonaburra National Park includes an extensive area of sandplain and dune field country, featuring a vast network of water sources. These water depressions, also known as gilgais or melon holes, act as important water sources for many species. The park supports habitat for 30 threatened animal species, including the Major Mitchell cockatoo, malleefowl and fat-tailed dunnart. It also contains 2 threatened ecological communities, acacia melvillei shrubland and sandhill pine woodland.

What we're doing for Biodiversity in this park

Plants and animals protected in this park

Animals

  • Emu, Paroo Darling National Park. Photo: John Spencer

    Emu (Dromaius novaehollandiae)

    The largest of Australian birds, the emu stands up to 2m high and is the second largest bird in the world, after the ostrich. Emus live in pairs or family groups. The male emu incubates and rears the young, which will stay with the adult emus for up to 2 years.

  • Red kangaroo, Sturt National Park. Photo: John Spencer

    Red kangaroo (Macropus rufus)

    The red kangaroo is one of the most iconic Australian animals and the largest marsupial in the world. Large males have reddish fur and can reach a height of 2m, while females are considerably smaller and have blue-grey fur. Red kangaroos are herbivores and mainly eat grass.

  • Wedge-tailed eagle. Photo: Kelly Nowak

    Wedge-tailed eagle (Aquila audax)

    With a wingspan of up to 2.5m, the wedge-tailed eagle is Australia’s largest bird of prey. These Australian animals are found in woodlands across NSW, and have the ability to soar to heights of over 2km. If you’re bird watching, look out for the distinctive diamond-shaped tail of the eagle.

Plants

  • Mulga. Photo: Jaime Plaza

    Mulga (Acacia aneura)

    Mulga are hardy Australian native plants found throughout inland Australia. With an unusually long tap root, the mulga is able to withstand long periods of drought.

Look out for...

Red kangaroo

Macropus rufus

Red kangaroo, Sturt National Park. Photo: John Spencer

The red kangaroo is one of the most iconic Australian animals and the largest marsupial in the world. Large males have reddish fur and can reach a height of 2m, while females are considerably smaller and have blue-grey fur. Red kangaroos are herbivores and mainly eat grass.

Environments in this park

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