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She-Oak crossing walk

Bomaderry Creek Regional Park

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Learn more about why this park is special

She-Oak crossing walk is in Bomaderry Creek Regional Park. Here are just some of the reasons why this park is special:

A gorge of rainforest and sandstone

She Oak Crossing walk, Bomaderry Creek Regional Park. Photo: Pam Lunnon

Bomaderry Creek has forged in the landscape a winding, cliff-lined gorge with sandstone outcrops and great slabs of fallen rock. The gorge not only looks dramatic, but also protects a diverse and beautiful environment, making it a wonderful spot to visit.

  • Falcon Crescent link track Take this track across the open wooded heath from North Nowra down into the beautiful gorge and link with the lovely walks of Bomaderry Creek.
  • She-Oak crossing walk This two hour walk through Bomaderry Creek Regional Park boasts a hidden gorge with sandstone rock faces and boulders, creek and rainforest, and is suitable for dog walking.

Aboriginal cultural experience

Mossy Gully, Bomaderry Creek Regional Park. Photo: OEH

Bomaderry Creek contains several sites of importance to its original inhabitants, and you're likely to see evidence of Aboriginal heritage such as rock shelters and axe-grinding grooves during your visit. The shade and abundant water and fish this unique place offered provided a welcoming environment for its dwellers, and it's full of stories of the past. Archaeological evidence and sites across the gorge country indicate that for the last 2000 years the park saw a diversity of use: for seasonal food gathering and possibly for ceremonial and social activity.

  • Bomaderry Creek picnic area Enjoy a bush picnic by the barbecue at Bomaderry Creek – it’s peaceful, surrounded by wildflowers and a short drive from Nowra on the Princes Highway.
  • Then and now: Aboriginal culture This excursion experience has been updated and is now being delivered in line with the new NSW Department of Education Curriculum. We will be revising this excursion's name and information online soon...
  • Then and now: Aboriginal culture This excursion experience has been updated and is now being delivered in line with the new NSW Department of Education Curriculum. We will be revising this excursion's name and information online soon...

Precious resources

Bomaderry Creek Regional Park. Photo: OEH

The water was important to European settlers as well as Aboriginal people. In 1938, a weir was built on Bomaderry Creek to provide the first reliable water supply for the town of Bomaderry. When the weir waters were no longer needed for town water, a section of the weir was taken out to allow Australian bass and other fish free movement along the creek in a fishway. You can see the weir from the lookout near the picnic area.

Rare plants

Bomaderry Creek, Bomaderry Creek Regional Park. Photo: OEH

A walk through this lovely park in spring will reward you with the sight of an array of beautiful wildflowers. You'll find this small park surprisingly rich with threatened plant species, including the endangered Guinea flower, the vulnerable albatross mallee, and Bauer's midge orchid. But perhaps the most unique plant that calls this park home is the endangered Bomaderry zieria - it only grows within the park and surrounding bushland and nowhere else in the world. The park is also alive with animal activity - Australian bass and other fish use the fishway in the weir to travel upstream. Threatened species found here include the glossy black cockatoo, masked owl and yellow-bellied glider.

  • Bomaderry Creek picnic area Enjoy a bush picnic by the barbecue at Bomaderry Creek – it’s peaceful, surrounded by wildflowers and a short drive from Nowra on the Princes Highway.
  • She-Oak crossing walk This two hour walk through Bomaderry Creek Regional Park boasts a hidden gorge with sandstone rock faces and boulders, creek and rainforest, and is suitable for dog walking.

Education resources (1)

School excursions (2)

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