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Mount Nangar walking track

Nangar National Park

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Learn more about why this park is special

Mount Nangar walking track is in Nangar National Park. Here are just some of the reasons why this park is special:

A refuge for wildlife

 Bottlebrush (Callistemon), Nangar National Park. Photo: Claire Davis

Amid the extensive farmlands of the central west, Nangar is home to many sedentary and migratory birds and local native animals. Among many bird species are several birds of prey such as the peregrine falcon, wedge-tailed eagle and brown falcon, which use the cliff face along the northern boundary for nesting and perching. The park is also home to the eastern grey kangaroo, common wallaroo, red-necked wallaby, swamp wallaby, little mastiff-bat and chocolate wattled bat. You may also spot the southern rainbow skink, eastern long-necked tortoise and spotted grass frog.

  • Mount Murga walking track Enjoy scenic views, spring wildflowers, varied wildlife and birdwatching on Mount Murga walking track; great for a day of bushwalking near Orange and Forbes.
  • Mount Nangar walking track Mount Nangar walking track to the lookout takes you bushwalking through varied landscapes to scenic views over Nangar National Park and surrounding farmlands in search of wildlife and wildflowers.

An ever-changing landscape

Dripping Rock, Nangar National Park. Photo: A Lavender

Ranging from the undulating hills in the south of the park to the long cliff line of red siltstone on the northern boundary - and the 770m-high Mount Nangar - the park offers a great variety of landscapes and views. Terarra Creek valley is open with wide creek flats and gentle slopes and the upper tributaries of Mogong Creek contains several natural springs. You'll see from the high vantage points of the park that the valley floor and more accessible lower slopes have been cleared by grazing and logging. Old growth forest is found in the steeper areas, but under national park protection, the park's vegetation communities will grow ever stronger.

  • Mount Murga walking track Enjoy scenic views, spring wildflowers, varied wildlife and birdwatching on Mount Murga walking track; great for a day of bushwalking near Orange and Forbes.
  • Mount Nangar walking track Mount Nangar walking track to the lookout takes you bushwalking through varied landscapes to scenic views over Nangar National Park and surrounding farmlands in search of wildlife and wildflowers.

Historic treasure

Dripping Rock shearing shed, Nangar National Park. Photo: OEH

Gold was discovered around Eugowra in the 1860s, drawing miners and bushrangers, including the Gardener and Ben Hall gangs who roamed the area that the park now covers. Chinese miners lived here in the early 1900s, prospecting for copper. Historical remains in the park include remnants of gardens and orchards of Dripping Rock homestead, lost to fire in recent years, and its piggery, ruined hay shed and yards.

Wiradjuri country

Nangar lookout, Nangar National Park. Photo: A Lavender

A vast area of the central west of New South Wales, including Nangar National Park, is Wiradjuri country. Evidence suggests that Nangar Range has been an important landmark in Aboriginal culture and that the surrounding area was occupied for long periods. Places of significance include archaeological sites containing artefacts, stone scatters, quarries and scar trees.

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Mt Nangar hiking track, Nangar National Park. Photo: A Lavender/NSW Government