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William Howe Regional Park

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Learn more about why this park is special

William Howe Regional Park is a special place. Here are just some of the reasons why:

Ancient landscapes

Turkeys Nest picnic area and lookout, William Howe Regional Park. Photo: John Yurasek

William Howe Regional Park is within the traditional lands of the Sweet Water Dharawal Aboriginal People. The park's prominent and elevated setting was important for communication, camping and spotting animals. The park's landscapes features Aboriginal storylines and continues to be an important place for Aboriginal people today.

What we're doing for Aboriginal culture in this park

Nature in the suburbs

Loop trail, William Howe Regional Park. Photo: John Yurasek

Whether you're heading out for a run, a walk with the dog or a weekend picnic with the kids, it's great to have a local park where you can get back in touch with nature. Listen to the birds, check out the views and enjoy the feeling of space that comes with getting out and about in nature.

Extend your backyard

Loop trail, William Howe Regional Park. Photo: John Yurasek

Situated at the end of several suburban streets, you can enjoy William Howe Regional Park any time you feel like a good dose of fresh air. Walk after work, take the kids for a ramble to burn off some energy, head out with your dogs or find a quiet spot to take time out from a busy day - you'll feel all the better for it.

What we're doing for Visitor facilities and experiences in this park

Plants and animals you may see

Animals

  • Brown-striped frog. Photo: Rosie Nicolai/OEH

    Brown-striped frog (Lymnastes peronii)

    One of the most common frogs found in Australia, the ground-dwelling brown-striped frog lives in ponds, dams and swamps along the east coast. Also known as the striped marsh frog, this amphibian grows to 6.5cm across and has a distinctive ‘tok’ call that can be heard all year round.

  • Peron's tree frog. Photo: Rosie Nicolai

    Peron's tree frog (Litoria peroni)

    Peron’s tree frog is found right across NSW. These tree-climbing and ground-dwelling Australian animals can quickly change colour, ranging from pale green-grey by day, to a reddish brown with emerald green flecks at night. The male frog has a drill-like call, which has been described as a 'maniacal cackle’.

  •  Blue Tongue lizard. Photo: Rosie Nicolai

    Eastern blue-tongue lizard (Tiliqua scinciodes)

    The eastern blue-tongue lizard, one of the largest skinks in Australia, is found throughout most of NSW. When threatened, the eastern blue-tongue lizard displays its blue tongue in a wide-mouthed intimidating show. Not an agile animal, they feed on slow-moving beetles and snails.

Look out for...

Eastern blue-tongue lizard

Tiliqua scinciodes

 Blue Tongue lizard. Photo: Rosie Nicolai

The eastern blue-tongue lizard, one of the largest skinks in Australia, is found throughout most of NSW. When threatened, the eastern blue-tongue lizard displays its blue tongue in a wide-mouthed intimidating show. Not an agile animal, they feed on slow-moving beetles and snails.

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William Howe Regional Park. Photo: John Yurasek