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Ku-ring-gai Chase National Park

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What we're doing

Park management activities

Ku-ring-gai Chase National Park has management strategies in place to protect and conserve the values of this park. Visit the detailed park and fire management documents. Here is just some of the work we’re doing to conserve these values:

Preserving biodiversity

NPWS works to monitor and help recover populations of plants and animals in Ku-ring-gai Chase National Park. Ongoing efforts to protect threatened, vulnerable and endangered species include observation, surveys, and distribution and population data collection. The park appreciates the public’s contribution to preserving its biodiversity. Volunteer programs take place in this park, and include seed planting and propagation.

Managing weeds, pest animals and other threats

Pests and weeds have a significant impact to ecosystems within Ku-ring-gai Chase National Park. Reduction of these threats, such as foxes, bitou bush and boneseed, as well as ongoing risk assessments for new and emerging weeds, is an important part of the work NPWS does to protect the biodiversity values of this park.

Historic heritage in our parks and reserves

Ku-ring-gai Chase National Park features notable historic heritage. Memorial sites within the park receive ongoing conservation work to preserve it for years to come, and the park undertakes routine maintenance and upgrading of all its facilities.

Developing visitor facilities and experiences

Ku-ring-gai Chase National Park offers some of the area’s best recreational activities, including kilometres of walking tracks and horse riding and mountain biking trails. NPWS undertakes regular maintenance of such infrastructure and facilities, and considers the addition of new ones where appropriate.

Conserving our Aboriginal culture

Ku-ring-gai Chase National Park is home to many Aboriginal sites. NPWS continues to monitor the conditions of Aboriginal sites in Ku-ring-gai to ensure that the culture of this park is preserved for years to come.

Managing fire

NSW is one of the most bushfire prone areas in the world as a result of our climate, weather systems, vegetation and the rugged terrain. NPWS is committed to maintaining natural and cultural heritage values and minimising the likelihood and impact of bushfires via a strategic program of fire research, fire planning, hazard reduction, highly trained rapid response firefighting crews and community alerts.

Contact

  • in the Sydney and surrounds region
  • Ku-ring-gai Chase National Park is open sunrise to sunset but may have to close at times due to poor weather or fire danger.

    • The entrance to Bobbin Head and Appletree Bay is closed from 8pm to 6am during daylight savings periods, and from 5.30pm to 6am the rest of the year.
    • Gates to West Head are closed from 8.30pm to 6am during daylight savings periods, and from 6pm to 6am the rest of the year.
  • Park entry fees:

    $12 per vehicle per day.

    Vehicles over 8 seats: $4.40 per adult, $2.20 per child (per day). Students on educational programs: $1.10 per student. Teachers/educational supervisors: free (1 adult per 10 students).

    Other fees:

    A $3 per adult, $2 per child landing fee may apply for day visitors to The Basin campground. Please pay at the campground wharf. Landing fees are included in your camping fees.

    Buy annual pass
    • Bobbin Head Information Centre
      02 9472 8949
      Contact hours: 10am to 4pm daily. 9am to 4pm during summer school holidays, closed 12pm-12:30pm. Closed Christmas Day.
    • 688 Ku-ring-gai Chase Road, Mount Colah, NSW 2079
    • Email: bobbin.head@environment.nsw.gov.au
    More
See more visitor info

Get involved

Pittwater Bush regeneration

Pittwater Bush regeneration

Volunteer for 2 mornings of bush regeneration at Ku-ring-gai Chase National Park, only minutes from Sydney’s Northern Beaches. Enjoy a beautiful bush retreat while helping to remove weeds and protect the biodiversity of local native spotted gum forest.

More volunteering