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Gundabooka National Park

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Learn more about why this park is special

Gundabooka National Park is a special place. Here are just some of the reasons why:

The beautiful outback

Gorge in Gundabooka National Park. Photo: David Finnegan

Gundabooka National Park is located in northwest NSW, approximately 50km southwest of Bourke and 110km northwest of Cobar. The 63,903ha national park extends from the Darling river banks to the Gunderbooka range. Vast stretches of grassy woodlands, open plains and rust-coloured rock dominate the landscape.

  • Little Mountain walking track Ideal for outback birdwatching and walking with kids, Little Mountain walking track offers a gentle walk with scenic views of Gundabooka National Park, near Bourke.

Rewarding walks

Bennetts Gorge picnic area, Gundabooka National Park. Photo: John Good

There are a number of opportunities to stretch your legs along one of the well-signed walks in Gundabooka National Park. Take the wonderful Mulareenya Creek Art Site track and see fascinating Aboriginal rock art. Walking the Little Mountain track is also well worth the effort with impressive views awaiting you at the summit.

  • Bennetts Gorge picnic area Stop and relax at Bennetts Gorge picnic area when you visit Gundabooka National Park. Enjoy a barbecue or bring a picnic hamper before walking on to Mt Gunderbooka.
  • Valley of the Eagles walk Valley of the Eagles walk starts at the popular Bennetts Gorge picnic area and explores the imposing Mount Gunderbooka in Gunabooka National Park.

What we're doing for Visitor facilities and experiences in this park

Pastoral history

Belah Shearer's Quarters, Gundabooka National Park. Photo: Boris Hlavica

Though noted by Charles Sturt in 1829, the Gunderbooka range wasn't used by pastoralists until the late 1800s. The range was included in neighbouring sheep stations which were then subdivided after World War I. Today, three of these smaller stations - Ben Lomond, Belah and Mulgowan - make up Gundabooka National Park. Check out the old homesteads, quarters, fences, tanks, shearing sheds and yards on your visit.

An important place

Aboriginal paintings in Gundabooka Historic Site. Photo: David Finnegan

Gunderbooka range is highly significant to the Ngemba and Kurnu Baakandji people of western NSW. Before it became a national park, the area was home to the Ngemba and Kurnu Baakandji people of western NSW. Ceremonial events were held within the range. On your visit, you'll see Aboriginal rock art, with motifs including dancers and animals.

What we're doing for Aboriginal culture in this park

An emphasis on conservation

Emus (Dromaius novaehollandiae) in Gundabooka National Park. Photo: David Finnegan

A visit to Gundabooka National Park offers the wonderful opportunity to spot some of Australia's rarest birds and animals. Several threatened species - including the little pied bat, kultarr, pink cockatoo and painted honeyeater - have been recorded in the area. The park also includes 21 different plant communities, including threatened plant species like the curly bark wattle.

  • Little Mountain walking track Ideal for outback birdwatching and walking with kids, Little Mountain walking track offers a gentle walk with scenic views of Gundabooka National Park, near Bourke.

What we're doing for Biodiversity in this park

Plants and animals you may see

Animals

  • Emu, Yanga National Park. Photo: David Finnegan

    Emu (Dromaius novaehollandiae)

    The largest of Australian birds, the emu stands up to 2m high and is the second largest bird in the world, after the ostrich. Emus live in pairs or family groups. The male emu incubates and rears the young, which will stay with the adult emus for up to 2 years.

  • Wedge-tailed eagle. Photo: Kelly Nowak

    Wedge-tailed eagle (Aquila audax)

    With a wingspan of up to 2.5m, the wedge-tailed eagle is Australia’s largest bird of prey. These Australian animals are found in woodlands across NSW, and have the ability to soar to heights of over 2km. If you’re bird watching, look out for the distinctive diamond-shaped tail of the eagle.

  • Red kangaroo, Sturt National Park. Photo: John Spencer

    Red kangaroo (Macropus rufus)

    The red kangaroo is one of the most iconic Australian animals and the largest marsupial in the world. Large males have reddish fur and can reach a height of 2m, while females are considerably smaller and have blue-grey fur. Red kangaroos are herbivores and mainly eat grass.

Plants

  • Mulga. Photo: Jaime Plaza

    Mulga (Acacia aneura)

    Mulga are hardy Australian native plants found throughout inland Australia. With an unusually long tap root, the mulga is able to withstand long periods of drought.

Look out for...

Red kangaroo

Macropus rufus

Red kangaroo, Sturt National Park. Photo: John Spencer

The red kangaroo is one of the most iconic Australian animals and the largest marsupial in the world. Large males have reddish fur and can reach a height of 2m, while females are considerably smaller and have blue-grey fur. Red kangaroos are herbivores and mainly eat grass.

Environments in this park

Education resources (1)

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Mulgowan Walk, Gundabooka National Park. Photo: David Finnegan