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Kangarutha walking track

Bournda National Park

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Learn more about why this park is special

Kangarutha walking track is in Bournda National Park. Here are just some of the reasons why this park is special:

Birdwatchers haven

Wallagoot Lake, Bournda National Park. Photo: John Spencer

With around 200 species of birds in the area, Bournda is a birdwatcher's paradise. The estuarine wetlands at the eastern end of Wallagoot Lake provide roosting and feeding areas for a large variety of waders and waterfowl. Keep your eyes out for threatened species like the little tern, hooded plover and pied oystercatcher. Bondi Lake is the largest freshwater lake situated behind coastal dunes in the region, and is another important habitat for waterbirds.

  • Bournda by water Join a guided canoeing adventure in Bournda National Park. You'll explore the park from a unique perspective as you paddle. It's a fun way to find out about the park's waterways.
  • Bournda Lagoon Bournda Lagoon is an ideal spot within Bournda National Park, near North Tura, where kids can swim, fish and go paddling and picnic among the paper barks.
  • Bournda rainforest and dragons walk See the sights of Bournda National Park on this 6km guided walk. Located north of Merimbula, you'll pass Bournda Lagoon and maybe even spot an eastern water dragon.
  • Kangarutha walking track Kangarutha walking track, in Bournda National Park, is a hiking route with scenic coastal views and birdwatching, picnicking and swimming opportunities along the way.
  • Sandy Creek loop track Taking in Bournda Lagoon, Sandy Creek and pockets of dry sclerophyll forest, Sandy Creek loop track is a hike in Bournda National Park on the far South Coast.

Get active

Kianinny Bay picnic area, Bournda National Park. Photo: John Spencer

With so much to do, there's no excuse not to get active in Bournda. The beaches and waterways offer a range of options for watersport enthusiasts - waterskiing, boating, paddling, sail boarding, fishing, swimming and surfing. The coastal walk is perfect for hikers and those hoping to spot migrating whales. And for cyclists, the roads throughout the park are an extensive network to navigate on your bike.

Ships ahoy

Kianinny Bay picnic area, Bournda National Park. Photo: John Spencer

There's plenty of fascinating heritage in Bournda, dating back to the 1830s when European settlement of the district began. Today, you can still see anchor bolts at Kangarutha Point, which was established as a port with Kianinny Bay in 1859. It's also believed the existing track to the point, and parts of the coastal walk, were once used to supply ships anchored there, and transport produce and passengers. Some building remains can also be found around Games Bay, which was cleared for dairy farming by settler Mr Games.

The land of generations

Turingal Head, Bournda National Park. Photo: John Spencer

Bournda has been a special place for the Dhurga and Yuin people for thousands of years, with its plentiful food supply and quarry for making tools. As you explore the park and its wildlife, it'll be no surprise that 'Bournda' means 'place of tea tree and kangaroos'.

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Kangarutha walking track, Bournda National Park. Photo: John Spencer