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Cascades walking track and viewing platform

Wadbilliga National Park

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Learn more about why this park is special

Cascades walking track and viewing platform is in Wadbilliga National Park. Here are just some of the reasons why this park is special:

A botanist's wonderland

Rocky creek, Wadbilliga National Park. Photo: L Morrell/OEH

Wadbilliga has many impressive examples of open forest, woodland, heath, swamp, bogs and numerous pockets of rainforest. There are some rare species of eucalypt and acacia that do not occur anywhere else. In the Wadbilliga Valley, yellow box and forest red gum can be seen, while on the ridge tops tower large stands of silvertop ash with snow gums at high altitudes. The Wadbilliga Plateau also has dwarf she-oaks and rare stunted mallee eucalypts.

A glimpse of gold mining history

Cascades, Wadbilliga National Park. Photo: Lucas Boyd

The surrounding area has a variety of artefacts, structures and features that hark back to gold and silver mining eras, as well as the early forestry history of the local area. Today, visitors can still view various mining remains that are evidence of once arduous searches for gold and other precious materials.

A natural animal sanctuary

Epacris impressa, Wadbilliga National Park. Photo: Steve Douglas

Due to the rugged and isolated nature of the park, animal populations here have remained relatively undisturbed. Many of the park's animals are large marsupials such as swamp wallabies, eastern grey kangaroos and wombats. There are also possums, platypuses and echidnas and one of the biggest greater glider populations in all of Australia. The birdlife is varied too, with over 120 native species. Lyrebirds are common as are many colourful and tuneful bush birds.

  • Cascades walking track and viewing platform Cascades walking track takes you to a viewing platform with scenic views of the spectacular Tuross River, which cascades into a refreshing pool that’s ideal for a summer swim.
  • Tuross Falls walking track Turross Falls walking track is a medium difficulty 4km bushwalk at Wadbilliga National Park featuring scenic views, waterfalls, picnicking opportunities and birdwatching.

Aboriginal cultural heritage

Tuross Falls walking track, Wadbilliga National Park. Photo: Lucas Boyd

The Yuin people consider Wadbilliga National Park a sacred place and many sites in the park are strongly associated with Dreamtime stories. The dissected, rugged escarpment contains a network of bridle tracks that follow both high country and river courses, which Aboriginal people originally used. The bridle tracks are also the most tangible historical link with the first Europeans in the area and were used for transporting produce and moving stock from one location to another. The park is abundant in traditional foods and medicines.

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Cascades, Wadbilliga National Park. Photo: Lucas Boyd Photography/NSW Government