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Scenic trail

Wallarah National Park

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Learn more about why this park is special

Scenic trail is in Wallarah National Park. Here are just some of the reasons why this park is special:

Don't just stand there

Pinny Beach, Wallarah National Park. Photo: Susan Davis

Do you like to surf, or are you more into fishing? Are you the type who loves to hike, or do you prefer cycling? Are you an ocean-gazer or a forest-walker? Wallarah allows you to do any or all of these activities, so bring your gear and enjoy this natural playground.

  • Coastal walking track The Coastal walking track links Caves Beach with the headland just south of Pinny Beach, giving spectacular views over the coastline and ocean along the way.
  • Scenic trail Scenic trail is a challenging mountain bike ride - a steep scenic hike through coastal forest and heathland to views of the rugged coastline and access to Pinny Beach.
  • Yondeo trail A scenic walk or cycle on Yondeo trail in Wallarah National Park with places to picnic, birdwatching and whale watching opportunities and fishing at Pinny Beach.

Happy wandering

Pinny Beach, Wallarah National Park. Photo: Susan Davis

There are various vegetation communities in Wallarah, including heathland, spotted gum and ironbark forest, open smooth-barked apple forest and palm gully rainforest with a canopy dominated by cabbage-tree palm. Follow the various walking tracks through the park to experience these. Keep an eye out for blooming wattle and the intriguing scribbly gum, whose attractive artwork is, in fact, the tunnelling journey of scribbly gum moth's larvae. By the way, the purple-flowered vine you'll see growing throughout the park is known commonly as happy wanderer.

  • Coastal walking track The Coastal walking track links Caves Beach with the headland just south of Pinny Beach, giving spectacular views over the coastline and ocean along the way.
  • Scenic trail Scenic trail is a challenging mountain bike ride - a steep scenic hike through coastal forest and heathland to views of the rugged coastline and access to Pinny Beach.
  • Yondeo trail A scenic walk or cycle on Yondeo trail in Wallarah National Park with places to picnic, birdwatching and whale watching opportunities and fishing at Pinny Beach.

Living Aboriginal culture

Pinny Beach, Wallarah National Park. Photo: Susan Davis

Bahtabah Local Aboriginal Land Council represents the Aboriginal community in the area that is now covered by Wallarah National Park. Physical evidence of Aboriginal people's lives in the area has remained in the form of middens found just south of Swansea. Only a few middens have been recorded, though it is probable that sand mining along this coast over the years has destroyed a large portion of middens that were there prior to European settlement.

Wild and free

Yondeo trail, Wallarah National Park. Photo: Susan Davis

Wallarah has an awesome collection of birds and animals due to the diversity of vegetation and habitats in the park. During the day, look out for sea eagles soaring along the coast, honeyeaters in the springtime flowering heath, lizards lolling on warm boulders, pods of dolphins in the ocean and passing whales during the winter months. At night, you may see the predatory powerful owl, a microbat, or the threatened squirrel glider that glides for up to 50m between trees. Bring along your binoculars to get a closer look at these natural beauties.

  • Coastal walking track The Coastal walking track links Caves Beach with the headland just south of Pinny Beach, giving spectacular views over the coastline and ocean along the way.

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Pinny Beach. Photo: NSW Government