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Capertee campground

Capertee National Park

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Learn more about why this park is special

Capertee campground is in Capertee National Park. Here are just some of the reasons why this park is special:

Looking for things to do in Capertee?

Policeman's Point campground, Capertee National Park. Photo: Michelle Barton

There are great things to do when in Capertee. Enjoy fantastic bird watching any time of the year - the protected woodlands attract the threatened gang-gang and glossy black cockatoos, and Capertee Valley is one of only three known nesting areas for the endangered regent honeyeater. You'll find a range of options if you're looking for a place to stay, including Capertee Homestead, Cottage or campground. Bookings essential. You can also hike into remote Policemans Point campground.

  • Capertee Woolshed ruins Capertee Woolshed ruins, in Capertee National Park, offer a view of the historic heritage of the area, with walking, paddling and birdwatching opportunities nearby.
  • Valley lookout Relax with a picnic lunch at Valley lookout and enjoy dramatic views inside the world’s second largest canyon. It’s easily combined with a 4WD or camping getaway in Capertee National Park, near Rylsto...

Plant life abounds

Eastern grey kangaroo (Macropus giganteus), Capertee National Park. Photo: Michelle Barton

The park is home to rare grey grevillea shrubs, which bloom with pink and red flowers in spring. This hardy, dense shrub is found nowhere else but Capertee Valley. Fertile river flats and surrounding slopes host an ecological community of majestic yellow box, blakelys red gum and white box, providing a vital habitat for wildlife and native birds.

  • Capertee Woolshed ruins Capertee Woolshed ruins, in Capertee National Park, offer a view of the historic heritage of the area, with walking, paddling and birdwatching opportunities nearby.
  • Valley lookout Relax with a picnic lunch at Valley lookout and enjoy dramatic views inside the world’s second largest canyon. It’s easily combined with a 4WD or camping getaway in Capertee National Park, near Rylsto...

Wiradjuri country

Looking over the escarpment in Capertee National Park. Photo: Michelle Barton

Capertee National Park is within the traditional lands of Wiradjuri People. The surrounding countryside contains evidence of Aboriginal occupation in the form of rock art, scarred trees and artefacts. Traditional food plants and old travel routes are also present within the park.

Plants and animals protected in this park

Animals

  • Close up of a regent honeyeater bird perched on a tree branch. Photo: Mick Roderick © Mick Roderick

    Regent honeyeater (Anthochaera phrygia)

    The regent honeyeater is a critically endangered native bird. Once widespread across south-eastern Australia, only around 250 to 350 birds remain in the wild, making it at risk of extinction.

  • Swamp wallaby in Murramarang National Park. Photo: David Finnegan

    Swamp wallaby (Wallabia bicolor)

    The swamp wallaby, also known as the black wallaby or black pademelon, lives in the dense understorey of rainforests, woodlands and dry sclerophyll forest along eastern Australia. This unique Australian macropod has a dark black-grey coat with a distinctive light-coloured cheek stripe.

  • Sugar glider. Photo: Jeff Betteridge

    Sugar glider (Petaurus breviceps)

    The sugar glider is a tree-dwelling Australian native marsupial, found in tall eucalypt forests and woodlands along eastern NSW. The nocturnal sugar glider feeds on insects and birds, and satisfies its sweet tooth with nectar and pollens.

  • Bare-nosed wombat. Photo: Keith Gillett

    Bare-nosed wombat (Vombatus ursinus)

    A large, squat marsupial, the Australian bare-nosed wombat is a burrowing mammal found in coastal forests and mountain ranges across NSW and Victoria. The only other remaining species of wombat in NSW, the endangered southern hairy-nosed wombat, was considered extinct until relatively recently.

Look out for...

Bare-nosed wombat

Vombatus ursinus

Bare-nosed wombat. Photo: Keith Gillett

A large, squat marsupial, the Australian bare-nosed wombat is a burrowing mammal found in coastal forests and mountain ranges across NSW and Victoria. The only other remaining species of wombat in NSW, the endangered southern hairy-nosed wombat, was considered extinct until relatively recently.

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