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Yellomundee Regional Park

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Learn more about why this park is special

Yellomundee Regional Park is a special place. Here are just some of the reasons why:

Aboriginal culture

Coreena-Burrawang circuit, Yellomundee Regional Park. Photo: Paul Glass

Yellomundee Regional Park lies within the traditional territory of the Boorooberongal clan of the Darug people. The park protects special Aboriginal sites such as Shaws Creek ‘Aboriginal Place’ at the northern end of the park, a place of special significance to Aboriginal culture; demonstrating their connection to this ancient landscape. The park continues to be an important place for Aboriginal people today, with an Aboriginal Landcare group involved in volunteer work to care for this Country.

What we're doing for Aboriginal culture in this park

Natural beauty

Yellow Rock Lookout, Yellomundee Regional Park. Photo: John Yurasek

When you visit the park, you’ll find large sprawls of beautiful natural bushland, along with important pockets of alluvial and riverine plant communities. When bushwalking around Yellomundee Regional Park, be sure to take a moment to soak up the protected bushland area along Blue Mountains escarpment. The park protects endangered ecological communities such as shale and sandstone transition forests, Sydney coastal river-flat forest, Cooks River and Castlereagh ironbark forests, as well as ironbark open-forest. Yellomundee also connects the natural beauty of bushland from Nepean River to Blue Mountains National Park.

  • Hawkesbury lookout Ideally located on the drive between the Hawkesbury region and the Blue Mountains, Hawkesbury Lookout offers beautiful scenic views and is a great picnic spot.
  • Yellow Rock lookout Yellow Rock lookout in Yellomundee Regional Park offers incredible views and a peaceful haven where you can enjoy a picnic, go for a short bushwalk or just take some time out with family and friends.

What we're doing for Landscapes and geology in this park

Recreation ready

Yellow Rock lookout, Yellomundee Regional Park. Photo: John Yurasek

Yellomundee Regional Park is a popular spot with mountain bikers, with competitive clubs regularly using the area. The Western Sydney mountain Bike Club also undertake volunteer work in the park. The area south of Shaws Farm offers trails for varying technical abilities, including some fantastic single trail rides. Horse riding and dog walking are welcomed in Yellomundee, so bring your pet along.  Yellomundee sits on the first part of the escarpment between the flat Sydney basin and lofty Blue Mountains; making for a sweeping vista. Visit its scenic lookouts to be rewarded with views over the Nepean River and western Sydney. Both Yellow Rock and Hawkesbury lookouts feature picnicking facilities and ample space to enjoy the scenery.

  • Hawkesbury lookout Ideally located on the drive between the Hawkesbury region and the Blue Mountains, Hawkesbury Lookout offers beautiful scenic views and is a great picnic spot.
  • Yellow Rock lookout Yellow Rock lookout in Yellomundee Regional Park offers incredible views and a peaceful haven where you can enjoy a picnic, go for a short bushwalk or just take some time out with family and friends.

What we're doing for Visitor facilities and experiences in this park

Plants and animals you may see

Animals

  • Superb fairy wren. Photo: Ingo Oeland

    Superb fairy wren (Malurus cyaneus)

    The striking blue and black plumage of the adult male superb fairy wren makes for colourful bird watching across south-eastern Australia. The sociable superb fairy wrens, or blue wrens, are Australian birds living in groups consisting of a dominant male, mouse-brown female ‘jenny wrens’ and several tawny-brown juveniles.

  • Closeup of a laughing kookaburra's head and body. Photo: Rosie Nicolai/OEH

    Kookaburra (Dacelo novaeguineae)

    Of the 2 species of kookaburra found in Australia, the laughing kookaburra is the best-known and the largest of the native kingfishers. With its distinctive riotous call, the laughing kookaburra is commonly heard in open woodlands and forests throughout NSW national parks, making these ideal spots for bird watching.

Look out for...

Superb fairy wren

Malurus cyaneus

Superb fairy wren. Photo: Ingo Oeland

The striking blue and black plumage of the adult male superb fairy wren makes for colourful bird watching across south-eastern Australia. The sociable superb fairy wrens, or blue wrens, are Australian birds living in groups consisting of a dominant male, mouse-brown female ‘jenny wrens’ and several tawny-brown juveniles.

Environments in this park

Education resources (1)

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Yellow Pittosporum, an edible native bitter fruit endemic to Australia, in Yellomundee Regional Park. Photo: Rosie Nicolai/OEH