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Biamanga National Park

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Learn more about why this park is special

Biamanga National Park is a special place. Here are just some of the reasons why:

Yuin Country

Biamanga National Park. Photo: John Spencer

The landscape of Biamanga is sacred to the Yuin People, ancient custodians of this land, who maintain their strong traditional ties to it today. In 2006, Biamanga became jointly managed by the Aboriginal community and NPWS. There are a number of cultural sites throughout the area with spiritual significance for the Yuin. The best place to learn about these is Mumbulla Creek Falls, where interpretative signs detail the Aboriginal history of the region.

  • Biamanga Cultural area Biamanga Cultural area offers visitors to Biamanga National Park a scenic place to picnic and enjoy the short walk to a lookout with views over Mumbulla Falls and a beautiful gorge.

Volcanic legacy

Mumbulla Creek Falls, Biamanga National Park. Photo: John Spencer

Mumbulla Mountain rises in the middle of Biamanga, and is largely the legacy of an ancient shield volcano. You can see this most clearly through a granitic creek corridor with massive boulders and plunge pools. This is the course of Mumbulla Creek, which rushes toward the coast from its origins up in the mountain. This park conserves an important area of substantially pristine coastal foothill environments, with monkey and ribbon gums clustered around the creekbeds. It also contains the endangered chefs cap correa, an unusual lemon and green flower that looks exactly like its namesake. The shrubs are endemic to NSW and popular with local birds.

  • Biamanga Cultural area Biamanga Cultural area offers visitors to Biamanga National Park a scenic place to picnic and enjoy the short walk to a lookout with views over Mumbulla Falls and a beautiful gorge.

A precious haven

River gorge, Biamanga National Park. Photo: John Spencer

Biamanga conserves an important area of substantially pristine coastal foothill environments, with monkey and ribbon gums clustered around the creekbeds. It also contains the endangered chefs cap correa, an unusual lemon and green flower that looks exactly like its namesake. The shrubs are endemic to NSW and popular with local birds. Biamanga is also home to an array of wildlife, from goannas and eastern water dragons to swamp wallabies and some of the last remaining koalas in the south-eastern corner of NSW. Birds are also plentiful, including lyrebirds, azure kingfishers, flycatchers and blue wrens.

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Biamanga National Park. Photo: John Spencer/NSW Government