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Yuelarbah walking track

Glenrock State Conservation Area

Overview

Yuelarbah walking track is a great day walk within Glenrock State Conservation Area, near Newcastle. It features a lookout with scenic views, waterfalls and places to picnic.

Where
Glenrock State Conservation Area
Accessibility
Medium
Distance
6.8km return
Time suggested
2 - 3hrs
Grade
Grade 3
Price
Free
What to
bring
Sunscreen, hat, drinking water
Please note
Remember to take your binoculars if you want to birdwatch.

Part of the Great North walk that stretches 250km from Newcastle to Sydney, the Yuelarbah walking track is one of the highlights of Glenrock State Conservation Area.

Commencing at the wheelchair accessible raised boardwalk, the scenic track leads you along Flaggy Creek, through wet gullies and coastal rainforest, and if that's not enough, you'll pass two waterfalls before finishing at Glenrock Beach.

About halfway along you’ll find Leichhardt’s lookout which offers excellent views over Glenrock Lagoon. It’s a great option for a day walk, and be sure you take a picnic lunch with you; there are a few great spots to stop for a break along the walk, including the picnic area at Flaggy Creek and the beach or headlands of Glenrock Beach.

Take a virtual tour of Yuelarbah walking track trail captured with Google Street View Trekker.

For directions, safety and practical information, see visitor info

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A family walk a boardwalk section of Bouddi coastal walk, Bouddi National Park. Photo: John Spencer/OEH.

Conservation program:

Saving our Species conservation program

Saving our Species is a innovative conservation program in NSW. It aims to halt and reverse the growing numbers of Australian animals and plants facing extinction. This program aims to secure as many threatened species that can be secured in the wild as possible, for the next 100 years. 

Mountain pygmy possum (Burramys parvus). Photo: Cate Aitken

Operated by

Park info

See more visitor info
Person looking off the bridge.