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Moore Park picnic area

Moore Park Nature Reserve

Overview

Moore Park picnic area offers basic facilities for a leisurely lunch, with terrific opportunities for birdwatching and viewing the large flying fox population.

Type
Picnic areas
Where
Moore Park Nature Reserve
Accessibility
Medium
Price
Free
What to
bring
Drinking water, hat, sunscreen
Please note
  • Please avoid any disturbance to the flying fox camp while it’s occupied
  • Remember to take your binoculars if you want to go bird watching

Moore Park picnic area, at the north end of Moore Park Reserve, is the best place to start any visit to the area. Pack a barbecue lunch and settle down around some tables in the cool shade of the rainforest.

Moore Park Nature Reserve is the largest and best remaining example of lowland subtropical rainforest in the entire state, with 127 native plant species showing what the region looked like before widespread logging across the NSW Northern Rivers region in the last century. This makes it a superb place to escape from the hustle and bustle of modern life to the tranquil solitude of nature.

The picnic area is surrounded by beautiful scenery at the junction of Findon Creek and Richmond River. You might notice the high ridges of McPherson Range and Border Ranges National Park. Richmond Range begins to rise to the west and south.

Birdwatchers in particular will find much to occupy their attention here. Rainforest pigeons are often seen in the area, as well as black bitterns, bush hens, and the rose-crowned fruit dove. The grey-headed flying fox dominates the reserve for up to eight months a year. Massing together, they make a dramatic spectacle, but be careful not to disturb their camp when it’s occupied.

For directions, safety and practical information, see visitor info

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A family walk a boardwalk section of Bouddi coastal walk, Bouddi National Park. Photo: John Spencer/OEH.

Conservation program:

Saving our Species conservation program

Saving our Species is an innovative conservation program in NSW. This program aims to secure as many threatened species that can be secured in the wild as possible, for the next 100 years.

Mountain pygmy possum (Burramys parvus). Photo: Cate Aitken

Park info

See more visitor info
Moore Park picnic area, Moore Park Nature Reserve. Photo: OEH