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Mount Talowla lookout

Toorale National Park

Overview

For vast floodplain views to Mount Gunderbooka, check out Mount Talowla lookout, also known as Withawitha Iaana, in Toorale National Park and State Conservation Area, near Bourke.

Type
Lookouts
Where
Toorale National Park
Price
Free
What to
bring
Hat, sunscreen, drinking water
Please note
  • The weather in the area can be extreme and unpredictable, so please ensure you’re well-prepared for your visit.
  • Please respect the wishes of Kurnu-Baakandji People by protecting the natural and cultural features of the park.
  • Remember to take your binoculars if you want to go birdwatching.

Mount Talowla lookout has sweeping 360-degree views across Toorale National Park and State Conservation Area, and beyond. This site is known by local Kurnu-Baakandji People as Withawitha Iaana. This exceptional vantage point provides intrepid travellers and first-time visitors with a great introduction to the vast outback landscape of north-west NSW, near Bourke.

The lookout offers a great spot for birdwatching, so be sure to bring along your binoculars for a chance to see wedge-tailed eagles soaring above. In spring, the fluffy yellow heads of foxtail flowers peep above the drying grass tussocks.

At the summit, dotted mulga trees show off their yellow flowers in winter months. Gaze across to Dunlop Range in the south and Mount Gunderbooka in the east, as well as the seemingly never-ending western floodplains. Lines of trees in the distance indicate the path of ephemeral waterways.

For directions, safety and practical information, see visitor info

 

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A family walk a boardwalk section of Bouddi coastal walk, Bouddi National Park. Photo: John Spencer/OEH.

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Mount Talowla lookout, Toorale National Park and State Conservation Area. Photo: Gregory Anderson