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Seaham Swamp Bird Hide

Seaham Swamp Nature Reserve

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Learn more about why this park is special

Seaham Swamp Bird Hide is in Seaham Swamp Nature Reserve. Here are just some of the reasons why this park is special:

A colonial cottage

Toms cottage, Seaham Swamp Nature Reserve. Photo: John Spencer

Seaham Swamp Nature Reserve is also home to a historic slab cottage known as Tom McLellan’s Cottage, or simply Tom’s Cottage. Come see a fine example of a typical colonial era rural dwelling which was moved to its current location in the early 1900s. Though it’s named for Tom, the cottage was actually first built as a retirement home for his mother, Mary McLellan.

A rich Aboriginal heritage

Trees on the bank of the swamp,  Seaham Swamp Nature Reserve. Photo: John Spencer

The reserve lies within the area of the Worimi Local Aboriginal Land Council. In years gone by, it and the adjoining Williams River would have provided important resources to Aboriginal residents, such as waterfowl and fish. Looking at the reserve’s abundant melaleucas today, it’s fascinating to think those very trees would have delivered paperbark for cooking, while other barks may have been used for coolamons and other wooden implements.

Bird watching paradise

Pelicans (Pelecanus), Seaham Swamp Nature Reserve. Photo: John Spencer

Come and see why countless species live in and migrate to Seaham Swamp year after year. Look carefully and you’ll see species like white-bellied sea eagles, storks and glossy ibis. Listen out for the honking magpie goose and head to Seaham Swamp Bird Hide and see how many others you can spot. And don’t forget your camera – you’re sure to get some terrific photos. You may well see a grey kangaroo or eastern snake-necked turtle on your visit, as well as many wonderful birds. The reserve provides important habitats for a range of creatures on both wet and dry land. Roam the woodlands to see mighty ironbark and forest red gums and spot birds aplenty roosting in broad-leaved paperbarks. Some of these habitats are sadly under pressure, but revegetation is underway thanks to Seaham Primary School students.

  • Seaham Swamp Bird Hide See an array of birdlife at Seaham Swamp Bird Hide. A top Seaham attraction and picnic spot, this birdwatching haven is open all year round.
  • Seaham Swamp walk Seaham Swamp walk is a great option for walking with kids. This short walk near Newcastle and Raymond Terrace is also a must for birdwatching.

Incredible geology

The swamp,  Seaham Swamp Nature Reserve. Photo: John Spencer

Interested in natural history? The reserve protects Seaham Quarry, a historic site containing scientifically important sediments from ancient glacial thaw water. These sediments date back 90 -120 million years, and the quarry was dedicated for preservation in 1925 for scientific purposes. Check out the remarkable streaky rock and read the notice from Professor Edgeworth David, the pioneering geologist and explorer who first recognised the sediments’ glacigene origin in 1914.

  • Seaham Swamp Bird Hide See an array of birdlife at Seaham Swamp Bird Hide. A top Seaham attraction and picnic spot, this birdwatching haven is open all year round.
  • Seaham Swamp walk Seaham Swamp walk is a great option for walking with kids. This short walk near Newcastle and Raymond Terrace is also a must for birdwatching.

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Seaham Swamp Bird Hide, Seaham Swamp Nature Reserve. Photo: John Spencer/NSW Government