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Saltwater National Park

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Learn more about why this park is special

Saltwater National Park is a special place. Here are just some of the reasons why:

Surf's up

Wallabi Beach, Saltwater National Park. Photo: Kevin Carter

Saltwater Beach's headland is a highly popular surfing point break used for recreational surfing, as well as club and competition surf events. Take a stroll through a rainforest walking track, and be sure to do a spot of whale watching at Saltwater Point. The adjacent Saltwater Beach and Wallabi Beach are popular surfing and swimming areas.

  • Khappinghat Creek At the flat water Khappinghat Creek, kayak or canoe through undeveloped wetlands, mangroves and rainforest. Swimming and fishing near Taree on the mid-north coast of NSW.
  • Saltwater picnic area Enjoy relaxed picnicking or barbecues at this well-equipped picnic area with ocean beaches and walking tracks nearby where you can swim, fish, surf, kayak or birdwatch.

Unique geology and landscape

Saltwater headland, Saltwater National Park. Photo: Kevin Carter

Saltwater headland, which separates Wallabi Beach and Saltwater Beach, is one of only three headlands between Wallis Lake and the Manning River. Khappinghat Creek, which borders the park, is the largest area of undeveloped wetlands and the only naturally opening and closing estuarine system on the mid-north coast of NSW.

  • Five Islands walking track This gorgeous coastal walking track follows a part of the Saltwater National Park coastline that is rich in Aboriginal history with great spots for swimming, fishing, surfing, and sailing, near Taree.
  • Headland walking track This short walk around the headland takes you to a whale watching viewing platform, has Aboriginal history, is near Khappinghat Nature Reserve near Taree.

Striking plant life

Kookaburra (Dacelo novaeguineae), Saltwater National Park. Photo: John Spencer

Parts of the park are listed as endangered ecological communities and there are a number of rare and lovely plant species to be spotted here. Keep your eyes out on the walking tracks for magenta lilly pilly, a small tree with dark shiny leaves, magenta-coloured fruit and white-flowered wax plant. Pink-flowering pinnate boronia, and the golden flowers of the wallum banksia, among others, can all be seen in Saltwater National Park. The park also supports many marine-dependant species, such as the white-bellied sea eagle, as well as endangered or vulnerable species including the pied oystercatcher, little tern, the flesh-footed shearwater and osprey.

  • Headland walking track This short walk around the headland takes you to a whale watching viewing platform, has Aboriginal history, is near Khappinghat Nature Reserve near Taree.

Spiritually significant landscape

 Headland walking track, Saltwater National Park. Photo: John Spencer

Saltwater Beach and its surrounds are a cultural landscape of great importance to the local Aboriginal Biripi tribe. There are several sites related to the Dreamtime within the park, and the area is declared an Aboriginal Place. Joint management with Aboriginal people and local residents, in association with Saltwater Tribal Council and NPWS, gives this park special local importance.

  • Five Islands walking track This gorgeous coastal walking track follows a part of the Saltwater National Park coastline that is rich in Aboriginal history with great spots for swimming, fishing, surfing, and sailing, near Taree.
  • Saltwater picnic area Enjoy relaxed picnicking or barbecues at this well-equipped picnic area with ocean beaches and walking tracks nearby where you can swim, fish, surf, kayak or birdwatch.

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Saltwater headland, Saltwater NP. Photo: Kevin Carter/NSW Government