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Boorganna Nature Reserve

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Learn more about why this park is special

Boorganna Nature Reserve is a special place. Here are just some of the reasons why:

Traditional Aboriginal lands

Comboyne Plateau, Boorganna Nature Reserve. Photo: Karl Bayer

The traditional Aboriginal custodians of the reserve and surrounding area are the Birpai People, who once used the rainforests for a variety of important cultural purposes, such as gathering plants and animals for food and medicine. The origin of the name 'Boorganna' is uncertain, though it is thought that it refers to either the mahogany or lilly pilly trees that thrive in this area. The name 'Comboyne' is derived from 'Wambuyn', meaning 'the place of kangaroos', and indeed you're likely to spot many of these fascinating native creatures bounding along the plateau, particularly at dawn and dusk.

Preserving for the future

Rawson Falls walk, Boorganna Nature Reserve. Photo: L Feltus

Boorganna Nature Reserve is the second-oldest nature reserve in NSW and an important reminder of the extensive rainforest that once covered the entire Comboyne Plateau. Its deep red fertile soils are ideal for the rainforest and moist hardwood forests that grow here. In 1904, a small area around Rawson Falls was dedicated to the preservation of native flowers and public recreation.

  • Rawson Falls walk Follow Rawson Falls walk all the way to the scenic waterfalls, passing a lookout, picnic area and swimming hole, while enjoying birdwatching and wildlife along the way.

A natural haven

Southern angle-headed dragon (Hypsilurus spinipes), Boorganna Nature Reserve. Photo: Barbara Webster

Boorganna Nature Reserve has one of the most botanically diverse environments you're likely to encounter in NSW, with 6 types of forest, including subtropical, warm temperate, gully rainforest and wet and dry sclerophyll forest. The reserve forms part of the Tapin Tops/Killabakh regional wildlife corridor which protects a number of vulnerable species, including yellow-bellied gliders, long-nosed potoroos, parma wallabies, rufous scrub birds and Stephen's banded snake. Other unique animals recorded here include the spotted-tailed quoll, red-necked pademelon, swamp wallaby, and long-nosed bandicoot. Around 85 bird species also call this area home, including 2 vulnerable owls (the masked owl and sooty owl), and other threatened species such as rose robins, yellow-throated scrub wren, crimson rosellas, superb lyrebirds and scarlet honeyeaters.

  • Rawson Falls walk Follow Rawson Falls walk all the way to the scenic waterfalls, passing a lookout, picnic area and swimming hole, while enjoying birdwatching and wildlife along the way.

Winged paradise

Rainforest Canopy, Boorganna Nature Reserve. Photo: L Feltus

Be sure to bring your binoculars, because bird watching is one of the reserve’s most rewarding activities, thanks to the 85 species that call this area home. In addition to two vulnerable owls (the masked owl and sooty owl), other threatened species that find sanctuary here include rose robins, yellow-throated scrubwren, crimson rosellas, superb lyrebirds, scarlet honeyeaters, and many more.

  • Rawson Falls walk Follow Rawson Falls walk all the way to the scenic waterfalls, passing a lookout, picnic area and swimming hole, while enjoying birdwatching and wildlife along the way.

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Comboyne Plateau, Boorganna Nature Reserve. Photo: K Bayer/NSW Government