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The Drip walking track

Goulburn River National Park

Overview

The Drip walking track, near Mudgee, meanders beside the Goulburn River to The Drip, also known as 'the Great Dripping Wall’. Rain water trickling down through the porous rock wall makes it a cool oasis.

Where
Goulburn River National Park
Distance
2.8km return
Time suggested
1hr - 1hr 30min
Grade
Grade 3
Price
Free
What to
bring
Hat, sunscreen, snacks, drinking water, sturdy shoes, suitable clothing
Please note
  • There are some steps, handrails, uneven rocks and creek crossings along this track. It’s a good idea to wear long pants and enclosed shoes.  
  • You can visit The Drip during the day. If you’re camping, try Spring Gully or Big River campgrounds which are a 1 hour drive from The Drip, towards Wollar.
  • No fires or camping are permitted at The Drip.

The Drip Gorge is a significant place for the local Wiradjuri People. The best time to experience it is after a few days of rain, when you’ll see the sandstone walls dripping clear spring water. During a hot summer you’ll love its natural air-conditioning. It can be 10 to 15° cooler than the surrounding region on a hot day. It usually has a light fall of rain from water percolating through the rock.

This return track starts and ends at the carpark. Pack a picnic then take off on a bushwalk. If you’re not feeling energetic, rest in the shade on a seat along the track or dip your feet in the quiet rockpools.

The abundant plant life along the track adds to the beauty of The Drip. See if you can spot native apple gums, tree violets (named for their scent) and rocky outcrops with orchids and moss. After your walk, splash around in the Goulburn River or stop off at Hands on the Rock, an important Aboriginal rock art site at Ulan. It’s only 2km north of the Drip and well worth a visit.

For directions, safety and practical information, see visitor info

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Edward River canoe and kayak trail, Murray Valley National Park. Photo: David Finnegan.

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Mountain pygmy possum (Burramys parvus). Photo: Cate Aitken
Spring Gully campground, Goulburn River National Park. Photo: Nick Cubbin/NSW Government