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Grass Tree circuit

Dharug National Park

Overview

Suitable for the whole family, the easy Grass Tree circuit follows a level path through forest teeming with birdlife.

Where
Dharug National Park
Distance
1.6km loop
Time suggested
30min - 1hr
Grade
Grade 3
Price
Free
Opening times

Grass Tree circuit is always open but may have to close at times due to poor weather or fire danger.

What to
bring
Hat, sunscreen
Please note
  • The weather in this area can be extreme and unpredictable, so please ensure you’re well-prepared for your visit.
  • Remember to take your binoculars if you want to bird watch

Pack a picnic and get the family together for a great day out exploring Dharug National Park along Grass Tree circuit. This easy, undulating walking track starts near Mill Creek picnic area and meanders through rainforest and grass tree forest. It’s a family-friendly bushwalking option near the Hawkesbury.

Look up into the trees for cackling kookaburras, tiny fairy wrens and honeyeaters. This is also home to the shy lyrebird, although you’ll have to be quiet or you’ll scare them into the undergrowth. There’s also a chance you’ll see a goanna or two, sunning themselves on nearby rocks.

If you’ve worked up an appetite, there are plenty of spots to spread out a blanket, spark up the barbecue or enjoy a leisurely picnic.

For directions, safety and practical information, see visitor info

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Edward River canoe and kayak trail, Murray Valley National Park. Photo: David Finnegan.

Conservation program:

Saving our Species conservation program

Saving our Species is a innovative conservation program in NSW. It aims to halt and reverse the growing numbers of Australian animals and plants facing extinction. This program aims to secure as many threatened species that can be secured in the wild as possible, for the next 100 years. 

Mountain pygmy possum (Burramys parvus). Photo: Cate Aitken
Grass Tree circuit, Dharug National Park. Photo: Nick Cubbin