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Bluff Mountain walking track

Warrumbungle National Park

Overview

Bluff Mountain walking track rewards experienced, fit bushwalkers with Warrumbungle National Park’s best views. This very long and challenging steep hike climbs past spectacular rock spires and domes—up to the summit of Bluff Mountain.

Where
Warrumbungle National Park
Accessibility
No wheelchair access
Distance
17km loop
Time suggested
7 - 8hrs
Grade
Grade 4
Trip Intention Form

It's a good idea to let someone know where you're going. Fill in a trip intention form to send important details about your trip to your emergency contact.

Price
Free
Entry fees
Park entry fees apply
What to
bring
Drinking water, sturdy shoes, topographic map, hat, sunscreen, snacks, suitable clothing
Please note
  • Bluff Mountain walking track is very long with steep sections and some loose rock. You’ll need a high level of fitness.
  • This challenging hike suits walkers with a sense of adventure who like to tackle steep and technical terrain
  • Bring at least 2L of water and some snacks with you on this strenuous hike. Drinking water is not available and water is scarce in this park.
  • To break up the walk you can camp overnight at Balor Hut or Dows campgrounds which are located along this route.
  • Visit Warrumbungle National Park Visitor Centre before you set out to register your name for the walk, pick up a free trail map and get detailed route information and advice.

A must for adventurous bushwalkers, Bluff Mountain walking track follows the same route as Breadknife and Grand High Tops walk but this hike takes you to the top of Bluff Mountain. It offers unrivalled views of the Warrumbungles’ ancient volcanic landscape as you climb from remnant ancient rainforest to windswept mountain heath.

You’ll start and end at Pincham carpark. From the carpark, walk Pincham trail, which follows Spirey Creek. Once you pass the Spirey View lookout, the steep climbing soon rewards you with views of the spectacular Breadknife and Belougery Spire. Near Balor Hut campground, take Grand High Tops trail to its summit for more outstanding views of the famous Breadknife. Or take Dagda Shortcut if your goal is to reach Bluff Mountain faster.

Pause at Dows Camp to gaze at Bluff Mountain’s imposing cliff face before you head for its summit. Straight at first, the summit trail zig zags and become less distinct as you climb over rocky outcrops, passing stunted trees and groves of big grass trees. Don’t forget to look up to see birds of prey riding air currents above the cliff face.

At the rocky summit of Bluff Mountain, settle down for a well deserved lunch and spectacular views of Mount Exmouth, Tonduron Spire and Mount Naman’s thick lava flows. Enjoy the park’s only views of Bluff Pyramid and the vast western plains.

When you’re ready to leave its lofty heights, climb back down to the main track. Head past Ogma Gap campground then follow West Spirey Creek track back to Pincham carpark.

For directions, safety and practical information, see visitor info

 

Dark Sky Parks

Warrumbungle National Park is Australia's first Dark Sky Park, renowned for its crystal clear starry skies. Learn more about Dark Sky Parks and why they're special.

Starry night sky in Warrumbungle National Park. Photo: Colin Whelan

Camping:

Camp Pincham

Camp Pincham offers rustic walk-in camping with scenic views, walking, wildlife and wildflowers in Warrumbungles National Park, near Coonabarabran.

Signs at Pincham carpark, Warrumbungle National Park. Photo: Robert Cleary/DPIE

Operated by

Park info

See more visitor info
Wide view of Warrumbungles' rocky crags, spires and domes, with Bluff Moutain at centre. Photo: Simone Cottrell/OEH.