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Special Offer

Wolli Creek bush regeneration

Wolli Creek Regional Park

Overview

Join up

Volunteer with Wolli Creek Preservation Society to help protect the last area of substantial bushland in Sydney’s inner south-west. Be involved in volunteering activities such as weed removal, bush restoration, tree planting, bird surveys, bat counts, stream watch, administration, campaigning and promotion.

Work
Bush regeneration, weed and pest management
When

1st and 3rd Saturday of every month, 2nd Wednesday of every month, 2nd Sunday of every month, and the 3rd Friday of the month. 8am–11.30am (November to February). 9am–12.30pm (March to October).

Where
Wolli Creek Regional Park
Grade
Medium
Price
Free
Join up

You’re invited to become part of this important bush regeneration work in Wolli Creek. There are a wide range of volunteering opportunities such as:

  • Bird surveys
  • Planting sessions
  • Bush restoration
  • Bat counts
  • Administration
  • Campaigning
  • Promotion

For the outdoor types, enjoy fresh air and exercise while working alongside like-minded individuals in the park’s bushland, heathland, parkland, wetland and saltmarshes.

When you volunteer with the Wolli Creek Preservation Society, you’re provided with training, guidance, information and tools, and morning tea is always laid on. A map will be sent to you with meeting locations for weekly bushcare, and you’ll also receive regular information on upcoming events such as talks, walks and the annual dinner. There’s great public transport access to Wolli Creek Regional Park.

For directions, safety and practical information, see visitor info

 

Volunteer for bushfire recovery

Following this season's unprecedented bushfires, you can register your interest to help the NSW National Parks and Wildlife Service (NPWS) and the Saving our Species program rehabilitate and protect our threatened animals and plants.

Volunteers planting in Tomaree National Park. Photo: John Spencer/DPIE

 

Saving Our Species program

Australia is home to more than 500,000 animal and plant species, many of which are found nowhere else in the world. Saving our Species is a statewide conservation program that addresses the growing number of Australian animals and Australian native plants facing extinction.

Koala (Phascolarctos cinereus) in a tree. Photo: Courtesy of Taronga Zoo/OEH
Rocky lookout over the park to the suburbs, Wolli Creek Regional Park. Photo: John Spencer