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Murray River canoe trails

Murray Valley National Park

Overview

These 4 canoe trails in Murray Valley National Park and Victoria’s Barmah National Park offer something for every paddler. Canoe the flowing Murray River, secluded creeks or Barmah Lake.

When
September to April is the best time for paddling on the Murray River.
Where
Murray Valley National Park
Accessibility
Hard
Distance
2.7 to 17.4km of trails
Grade
Easy. Suitable for adults and children 10 years and over. All participants must be able to swim. Medium level of fitness required. No experience needed.
Price
Free
Please note

All 4 canoe trails in Murray Valley National Park and Barmah National Park have easy water access:

Picnic Point to Barmah Lakes day visitor area (17.4km, one-way, 3hr 30min)
Push off from Picnic Point and follow the mighty Murray downstream through the mouth of Barmah Lake. Stop by Swifts campground for a picnic.

Barmah Lakes day visitor area to Rices Bridge (2.74km, return, 30min)
Paddle downstream to explore Broken Creek and Rices Bridge, before returning the same way.

Barmah Lakes day visitor area to Barmah Lake (5.3km, loop, 1hr 20min)
Head upstream into Barmah Lake for a short loop. A longer loop leads to the lake’s upper reaches, thick with reeds.

Barmah Lakes day visitor area to Barmah (11.08km, one-way, 2hr 15min)
Feel the breeze on your face as you canoe downstream to the town of Barmah.

Enjoy the gentle splash of oars and creak of river red gum branches as you explore the mighty Murray River by paddle power. These Ramsar-listed wetlands are a haven for waterbirds and great for fishing.

For directions, safety and practical information, see visitor info

 

Try the kayak launch at Edward River Bridge

On your next visit to Murray Valley Regional Park, enjoy kayaking or canoeing using the wheelchair-accessible launch at Edward River Bridge picnic area.

Edward River Bridge kayak launch in Murray Valley Regional Park. Photo: Rhys Leslie/OEH

Operated by

Park info

See more visitor info
Gum trees reflecting in the river. Photo:David Finnegan