Edward River canoe and kayak trail

Murray Valley Regional Park

Open, check current alerts 

Overview

Edward River canoe and kayak trail in Murray Valley National Park is a great paddling spot with camping, picnic, and swimming opportunities. It's also equipped with a wheelchair-accessible kayak launch.

Where
Murray Valley Regional Park
Distance
61km of trails
Time suggested
2 days
Price
Free
What to
bring
Hat, sunscreen, drinking water
Please note
  • There's a wheelchair-accessible kayak launch at Edward River Bridge to help people with mobility restrictions get in and out of the water safely.
  • Tent-based camping along Edward River is free

Kayaking or canoeing Edward River in Murray Valley National Park is a great adventure that awaits you. Spend a few hours on the river, a whole day, or organise a multi-day journey and camp as you go at various places along the way. There's over 60km of water trails giving you so many options.

Edward River is a peaceful, lesser-known alternative to the nearby Murray River, so it’s ideal for paddlers of all age groups and experience levels. It also allows you to escape the summer crowds that can flock to Murray River during the holidays and over long weekends. Along Edward River canoe and kayak trail are beaches and swimming spots, which are great places to stop and have a picnic.

Edward River lies within the traditional lands of the Wamba Wamba and Perrepa Perrepa Nations. The traditional name for the river is ‘Kolety’ (pronounced ‘kol-etch’).

For directions, safety and practical information, see visitor info

Also see

  • View of Geoff Hocking's 4 historical steel sculptures, with Edward River in the background. Photo: Gavin Hansford/DPIE

    Sculpture in the Red Gums

    Sculpture in the Red Gums is in Murray Valley Regional Park at Edward River Bridge picnic area. It’s a unique way to learn about the rich history of the many different ways people use forests.

Current alerts in this area

There are no current alerts in this area.

Local alerts

For the latest updates on fires, closures and other alerts in this area, see https://www.nationalparks.nsw.gov.au/things-to-do/canoeing-paddling-experiences/edward-river-canoe-and-kayak-trail/local-alerts

Park info

Visitor info

All the practical information you need to know about Edward River canoe and kayak trail.

Getting there and parking

Edward River canoe and kayak trail is in the Gulpa, Deniliquin, Tuppal and Kyalite precincts of Murray Valley National Park. To get there:

  • To the east of Mathoura, take Picnic Point Road 7km to the Tocumwal (Murray Valley trail) turn-off.
  • Travel another 2.7km to Edwards Bridge
  • Paddle 5km upstream to the mouth of Edward River, where a weir controls the water level.

Road quality

Check the weather before you set out as the road to Edward River canoe and kayak trail can become boggy when it rains.

Parking

Parking is available along the route, a short walk from Edward River.

Best times to visit

There are lots of great things waiting for you in Murray Valley National Park. Here are some of the highlights.

Autumn

The perfect time for a camping holiday: the days are cooler and the nights are not yet too chilly.

Spring

If it's been a wet winter white ibis and straw necked ibis will be nesting from late winter through to spring.

Summer

A great time for water activities on the Murray - swimming in the river is a delightful way to spend your time.

Winter

The morning light sparkles on the river; try your hand at fishing for Murray cray.

Facilities

  • Drinking water is limited or not available in this area, so it’s a good idea to bring your own.
  • You’re encouraged to bring gas or fuel stoves, especially in summer during the fire season.

Maps and downloads

Safety messages

Boating safety

If you're out on your boat fishing, waterskiing or just cruising the waterways, the safety of you and your passengers is paramount.

Bushwalking safety

If you're keen to head out on a longer walk or a backpack camp, always be prepared. Read these bushwalking safety tips before you set off on a walking adventure in national parks.

Fishing safety

Fishing from a boat, the beach or by the river is a popular activity for many national park visitors. If you’re planning a day out fishing, check out these fishing safety tips.

Mobile safety

Dial Triple Zero (000) in an emergency. Download the Emergency Plus app before you visit, it helps emergency services locate you using your smartphone's GPS. Please note there is limited mobile phone reception in this park and you’ll need mobile reception to call Triple Zero (000).

Outback safety

Safety is of high priority in outback areas. In summer, temperatures can reach up to 50°C in some places. Food, water and fuel supplies can be scarce. Before you head off, check for road closures and use our contacts to stay safe in the outback.

Paddling safety

To make your paddling or kayaking adventure safer and more enjoyable, check out these paddling safety tips.

River and lake safety

The aquatic environment around rivers, lakes and lagoons can be unpredictable. If you're visiting these areas, take note of these river and lake safety tips.

Permitted

Fishing

A current NSW recreational fishing licence is required when fishing in all waters.

Prohibited

Pets

Pets and domestic animals (other than certified assistance animals) are not permitted. Find out which regional parks allow dog walking and see the pets in parks policy for more information.

Dogs may not be brought into Murray Valley National Park but they are permitted in Murray Valley Regional Park.

Smoking

NSW national parks are no smoking areas.

Nearby towns

Deniliquin (26 km)

Take time out to visit Murray Valley National Park, admire the serene wetlands and towering river red gums. Go for a walk or ride the Gulpa Creek track, bring your canoe or kayak along for a spot of paddling or head to Reed Beds bird hide for a spot of birdwatching.

www.visitnsw.com

Hay (129 km)

This exciting and innovative exhibition space uses contemporary design and cutting edge technology to tell the story of Australian sheep shearing. You'll meet the shearers, shed hands, cooks, classers, cockies, sheep and dogs behind the legends at this sparkling gallery-museum in Hay.

www.visitnsw.com

Moama (38 km)

Part of the largest continuous red gum forest in the world, this region is an important place for Aboriginal people. Keep your eyes open for Aboriginal sites, especially middens, oven mounds and scarred trees, where bark has been removed from the tree to make canoes, coolamons and shields.

www.visitnsw.com