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Red Hands Cave

Blue Mountains National Park

Overview

Red Hands Cave in Blue Mountains National Park is one of the best showcases of Aboriginal rock art in the area. It's reached via Red Hands Cave loop walking track.

Type
Aboriginal sites
Where
Blue Mountains National Park
Price
Free
Entry fees
Park entry fees apply
What to
bring
Drinking water, hat, sunscreen
Please note
  • Red Hands Cave is reached via the 8km loop Red Hands Cave walking track, which starts at the causeway near the park entrance.
  • You can also drive around 13km past the park entrance, along the unsealed Oaks trail and Red Hands trail, to Red Hands Cave carpark, for a 1km return walk.
  • Please respect this precious site and help protect it by not touching the art and avoiding flash photography.

Accessed along Red Hands Cave walking track, near Glenbrook, Red Hands Cave will mesmerise you with its layers of hand prints and stencils; one of the best examples of Aboriginal art in the Blue Mountains.

Although it’s thought to have been painted between 500 and 1600 years ago, you can still see the vibrant, earthy colours of red, yellow and white, which combine to make an overwhelming collage. Standing in front of this art is a highly emotive experience, and it’s impossible not to be transported back hundreds of years.

Amongst several techniques, the artists would chew a mixture of ochre and water, and then blow it over a hand resting on the wall, forming a stencil.

Whilst walking along the tranquil Red Hands Cave track to the cave, make sure you keep an eye out for the Aboriginal axe grinding grooves in the rocks beside Camp Fire Creek.

For directions, safety and practical information, see visitor info

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A family walk a boardwalk section of Bouddi coastal walk, Bouddi National Park. Photo: John Spencer/OEH.

Conservation program:

Bush Trackers

Bush Trackers was created to encourage children to engage with the environment in and around the Greater Blue Mountains World Heritage area. This program highlights the natural and cultural splendour of the greater Blue Mountains through education initiatives and bushwalks.

Charles Darwin walk, Blue Mountains National Park. Photo: Steve Alton

Operated by

Park info

See more visitor info
Red Hands Cave, Blue Mountains National Park. Photo: Steve Alton/NSW Government