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Wombat Creek campground

Barrington Tops National Park

Affected by closures, check current alerts 

Overview

Campground booking required

All campgrounds in NSW national parks require a booking. Click the 'search availability' button to see the dates available and any restrictions. If there's no availability you may not travel to, or stay at a campground. To prepare for your camping trip, read these camping safety tips.

Walk-in rustic Wombat Creek campground offers walking, wildlife, and wilderness in the sub-alpine region of World Heritage-listed Barrington Tops National Park, between Gloucester and Dungog.

Accommodation Details
Number of campsites 5
Camping type Tent, Remote/backpack camping
Facilities Barbecue facilities, toilets
What to bring Firewood, fuel stove
Price There are no camping fees at this campground but a $6 booking fee applies.
Bookings Bookings are required. Book online or call the National Parks Contact Centre on 1300 072 757.
Please note
  • There are no marked sites.
  • Barrington trail is only open to vehicles from October 1 to May 31. Temporary closures may occur during this period due to weather conditions. Check alerts for current closures.
  • Check the weather or contact Gloucester office before you set out.
  • A water-based mould (Phytophthora cinnamomi) is prevalent in this area. The mould attacks the roots of plants causing them to rot, causing a dieback of trees and plants. Efforts are in place to contain the area of contamination north of Black Swamp. You can help the long-term containment of the mould by cleaning your shoes and mountain bike tyres before and after entering this region.
  • You can help protect the fragile ecosystems of the region by avoiding using soap, shampoo, and detergents in waterways and taking all rubbish home with you.
  • This is a remote campground, please arrive well prepared.

When you’re ready for a night under the stars, make tracks to walk-in Wombat Creek campground, high in the remote wilderness of Barrington Tops National Park. Due to its isolation, this unique, sub-alpine region is habitat for a range of rare and endangered species; have fun spotting these.

You’ll be ready to take a load off and boil the billy when you arrive. Only accessed by walking track, there’s a more leisurely path via Careys Peak lookout or the more challenging Corker trail. Either way, this rustic camping spot makes a great base to explore this wild wonderland.

At night, cook up a feast fit for all the bushrangers who’ve hidden out in these wild hills over the years. Go spotlighting for a chance to see possums as well as greater gliders, wombats, and bandicoots.

For directions, safety and practical information, see visitor info

 

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A family walk a boardwalk section of Bouddi coastal walk, Bouddi National Park. Photo: John Spencer/OEH.

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