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McIntyres campground

Brindabella National Park

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Learn more about why this park is special

McIntyres campground is in Brindabella National Park. Here are just some of the reasons why this park is special:

Adventure abounds

Fishing at Flea Creek, Brindabella National Park. Photo: Murray Vanderveer

Brindabella offers a network of alpine trails just waiting to be explored by 4WD or trail bike. There are also several options for bushwalkers to explore the park, and even the opportunity to go horse riding on tracks from Doctors Flat Road northwards. Stay overnight at one of the remote campgrounds, or visit for the day and enjoy a leisurely picnic on the banks of the Goodradigbee River.

  • Flea Creek picnic area Pack a picnic and spend the day relaxing by the Goodradigbee River at Flea Creek picnic area. Enjoy a spot of birdwatching, fishing and swimming.

Lands of the Ngunawal, Wolgalu and Wiradjuri peoples

McIntyres campground, Brindabella National Park. Photo: Murray Vanderveer

Brindabella National Park lies within the tribal boundaries of the Ngunawal, Wolgalu and Wiradjuri people. To this day, the area has a spiritual significance to Aboriginal people. Mount Coree, which stands tall on the western side of the park, is named after the Aboriginal word for moth. Before European settlement, the area was a hunting ground for bogong moths.

The alpine huts of Brindabella

McIntyres Hut, Brindabella National Park. Photo: Murray Vanderveer

Brindabella includes several remains of the network of alpine huts that were once scattered throughout the Australian Alps. Visit Hume Sawmill in the north or head west to see McIntyres Hut on the Goodradigbee River. The original hut was built by Les McIntyre in 1948 as a fishing hut, but was burnt down in the late 1990s and was rebuilt by a group of keen 4WDers.

Wildlife wonders

Looking across the mountain range in Brindabella National Park. Photo: OEH

Brindabella's unique alpine and sub-alpine environment is home to many native animals, including threatened mammals like the spotted-tailed quoll or the yellow-bellied glider. With over 80 different species of birds seen in the park, it's also a birdwatchers haven. Look out for the yellow-tailed black cockatoo and peregrine falcon flying overhead, and have your binoculars handy to spot threatened species like the powerful owl, pink robin and olive whistler.

  • Flea Creek picnic area Pack a picnic and spend the day relaxing by the Goodradigbee River at Flea Creek picnic area. Enjoy a spot of birdwatching, fishing and swimming.

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McIntyres campground, Brindabella National Park. Photo: Murray van der Veer/NSW Government