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Glenbrook area

Blue Mountains National Park

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What we're doing

Park management activities

Glenbrook area is in Blue Mountains National Park. Blue Mountains National Park has management strategies in place to protect and conserve the values of this park. Visit the detailed park and fire management documents. Here is just some of the work we’re doing to conserve these values:

Conserving our Aboriginal culture

Blue Mountains National Park is dedicated to preserving its strong Aboriginal culture. Red Hands Cave is one of several significant sites around the park which are maintained. There’s a special viewing platform set out from the stencil print rock art which gives visitors better sightlines and helps preserve our important Aboriginal cultural heritage. Aboriginal site conditions are regularly assessed and recorded, and members of local Aboriginal communities are engaged wherever possible.

Biodiversity conservation

Blue Mountains National Park plays an important role in conserving NSW’s biodiversity by protecting its vulnerable, threatened and endangered plants and animals. We work closely with Blue Mountains City Council and local partners on conservation activities, such as the Saving Our Species program, which monitors the habitat, distribution and population of species. We also manage risks associated with introduced plants and animals, along with the impact of climate change.

Conservation program

BioNet

Uniting technology with the vast collection of information on biodiversity in NSW, BioNet is a valuable database open to any user. From individual plant sightings to detailed scientific surveys, it offers a wealth of knowledge about ecology and threatened species in NSW. 

Managing weeds, pest animals and other threats

Pests and weeds have a significant impact on the ecosystems and habitats within Blue Mountains National Park. Reducing introduced species, such as wild dogs, is an important part of our work to protect the integrity of ecosystems in the Glenbrook area. Cooperative programs are run with the local community, particularly neighbours of the park, to raise awareness of the effectiveness of programs for weeds and introduced animals.

Managing fire

NSW is one of the most bushfire prone areas in the world due to our climate, weather systems, vegetation and the rugged terrain. NPWS is committed to a program of fire research, fire planning, hazard reduction, tracking weather patterns such as lightning storms, and community alerts. This helps to reduce property risk while also recognising the important role of fire in native plants' lifecycles. The Enhanced Bushfire Management Program (EBMP) is in place in the Glenbrook area. This fire management program supports response teams of highly trained rapid response firefighters, who can respond to 100% of remote wildfires within 30mins of detection.

Conservation program

Vegetation, fire and climate change in Greater Blue Mountains Area

With its fire-prone dry sclerophyll forest, the World Heritage-listed Greater Blue Mountains Area is one of the most flammable environments on earth. Because of this, for management purposes, the area now has one of the most comprehensive fire regime analyses in the world.

Developing visitor facilities and experiences

We’re committed to developing first-class facilities for the enjoyment and safety of visitors to Blue Mountains National Park, one of Australia’s most visited parks. Visitor feedback and environmental sustainability are important in this eco-certified park. Maintenance and upgrades to roads, tracks, trails, campgrounds, picnic areas, lookouts and signage are ongoing. We regularly review the park’s recreational opportunities, identifying areas for improvement or addition.

Blue Mountains National Park has achieved Ecotourism Destination Certification, through Ecotourism Australia, recognising best practice sustainable tourism and visitation in protected areas.

Understanding landscapes and geology

Geo conservation efforts and research play an important role in protecting the World Heritage-listed landscapes and geology of Blue Mountains National Park. Rehabilitation and maintenance works is ongoing, to limit the impact of erosion, pollution and degradation to these ancient landscapes. The effects of climate change and visitation are also monitored to preserve the area’s delicate ecosystems.

Contact

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Nepean river reflection, Blue Mountains National Park. Photo: Nick Cubbin/OEH