Back to previous page
Print factsheet

Cape Byron State Conservation Area

What we're doing

Park management activities

Cape Byron State Conservation Area has management strategies in place to protect and conserve the values of this park. Visit the OEH website for detailed park and fire management documents. Here is just some of the work we’re doing to conserve these values:

Understanding landscapes and geology

Cape Byron State Conservation Area maintains and preserves the land and scenery within its borders. Visitors are able to fully enjoy its attractions as facilities and surrounding landscapes are regularly and carefully maintained.

Managing weeds, pest animals and other threats

Pests and weeds have a significant impact to the ecosystems within Cape Byron State Conservation Area. Risk assessments for new and emerging weeds are carried out as an ongoing initiative within the park. Pest management of bitou bush is an important part of the work NPWS does to protect the integrity of biodiversity which exists within Cape Byron.

Conservation program

Bitou bush threat abatement plan

Bitou bush poses a serious and widespread threat to threatened species populations and ecological communities on the NSW coast. The NPWS bitou bush threat abatement plan helps to reduce the impact of weeds at priority sites using control measures such as ground spraying, aerial spraying, biological control and physical removal.

Developing visitor facilities and experiences

Cape Byron State Conservation Area is committed to developing visitor facilities for its customers’ enjoyment and safety. Regular maintenance, upgrading and installation of recreational, accommodation and retail amenities and infrastructure take place in this park. NPWS works to monitor vulnerable species and address threats, which can include feral animals and weeds, and implements actions to target their impacts.

Conservation program

Tour guide and visitor services volunteer program

When you sign up to volunteer for tour guiding and visitor services, you’ll be doing something for yourself as well as for the benefit of visitors to NSW national parks.

Conserving our Aboriginal culture

There are a number of significant Aboriginal sites and artefacts within Cape Byron Conservation Area. NPWS is committed to protecting these important cultural items, and interpretive and educational programs are ongoing in this park.

Conservation program

The Pass midden

NSW National Parks first recorded The Pass midden in Cape Byron State Conservation Area in 1980. And, in 2013, ancient archaeological midden material was repatriated and displayed on Country. Today, along with our Aboriginal community partners, NPWS works to protect The Pass midden, both now and into the future.

Managing fire

NSW is one of the most bushfire prone areas in the world as a result of our climate, weather systems, vegetation and the rugged terrain. NPWS is committed to maintaining natural and cultural heritage values and minimising the likelihood and impact of bushfires via a strategic program of fire research, fire planning, hazard reduction, highly trained rapid response firefighting crews and community alerts.

Conservation program

Hazard reduction program

Managing fire-prone NSW national parks requires a three-pronged approach, including fire planning, community education, and fuel management. When it comes to fuel like dead wood, NPWS conducts planned hazard reduction activities like mowing and controlled burning to assist in the protection of life, property and community.

Contact

  • in the North Coast region
    • Cape Byron State Conservation Area is open all hours, but may have to close at times due to poor weather or fire danger.
    • Cape Byron Lighthouse precinct is open 8am to sunset.
    • The Maritime Museum in the former Lighthouse Keeper’s office at the base of the lighthouse is open 10am to 4pm daily.
    • Opening before 8am for events or disabled access can be arranged by prior notice – contact NPWS Byron Bay office during business hours 02 6639 8300.
  • Park entry fees:

    $8 per vehicle per hour/$4 per hour motorcycles at Cape Byron Lighthouse precinct and Information Centre carpark. Maximum 1 hour per vehicle per calendar day, including all NPWS annual passholders.

    $4 per vehicle/motorcycle per hour in the lower lighthouse carparks and at Captain Cook lookout, Cosy Corner, and The Pass carparks. Coin-operated and credit card payment available.

    Buy an annual pass.
  • More
  • More
See more visitor info

Get involved

Cape Byron Lighthouse Friends

Cape Byron Lighthouse Friends

Looking for volunteer work with a view? If you’ve got a minimum of 3 hours a week to spare, come and be part of a friendly team at Cape Byron. Lead guided tours of the museum and lighthouse and share the area’s fascinating maritime history with visitors.

Looking along the beach, Cosy Corner. Photo: John Spencer