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Brisbane Water National Park

What we're doing

Park management activities

Brisbane Water National Park has management strategies in place to protect and conserve the values of this park. Visit the detailed park and fire management documents. Here is just some of the work we’re doing to conserve these values:

Preserving biodiversity

Preserving biodiversity is a fundamental NPWS focus, and managing bushfire is a key component of this. Fire management plans are regularly prepared for and implemented in Brisbane Water National Park in order to protect threatened species.

Conservation program

Regional native vegetation mapping and classification

Creating a comprehensive guide to plant biodiversity in NSW, ecologists are conducting vegetation mapping and classification. Through the compilation of data, they are able to determine the baseline state-wide layer of native vegetation. This influences conservation policy and offers valuable insight into how plant life in NSW is changing over time.

Managing weeds, pest animals and other threats

Pests and weeds have a significant impact to the ecosystems within Brisbane Water National Park. Pest management is a priority for NPWS with the pest reduction of foxes and wild dogs being an important part of work undertaken to protect the integrity of biodiversity within this park. Risk assessments for new and emerging weeds are carried out as an ongoing initiative in Brisbane Water.

Conservation program

Wild dog control program

Wild dogs can have significant impacts on other animals and are regarded as pests. Our wild dog control program operates in many NSW national parks and reserves. When carrying out wild dog pest control, we aim to minimise the impact that they have on livestock and domestic pets, while maintaining dingo conservation in key areas.

Developing visitor facilities and experiences

Brisbane Water National Park is dedicated to providing first-class facilities for all of its visitors. Enhancements to tracks, trails, steps and platforms are ongoing in this park.

Managing fire

NSW is one of the most bushfire prone areas in the world as a result of our climate, weather systems, vegetation and the rugged terrain. NPWS is committed to maintaining natural and cultural heritage values and minimising the likelihood and impact of bushfires via a strategic program of fire research, fire planning, hazard reduction, highly trained rapid response firefighting crews and community alerts.

Conservation program

Planning for fire

Bushfires are inevitable across fire-prone vegetation types within NSW national parks. NPWS prepares for wildfires by working with other fire agencies, reserve neighbours and the community to ensure protection of life, property and biodiversity. Every park has its own fire management strategy, devised in consultation with partner fire authorities and the community to plan and prioritise fire management.

Contact

  • in the Sydney and surrounds region
  • Two picnic areas within the park close of an evening:

    • Girrakool picnic area is open 9am to 5pm every day
    • Somersby Falls picnic area is open 8am to 8pm during daylight savings and is open 8am to 5pm at other times

    Other areas of Brisbane Water National Park will be open at all times, however may have to close at times due to poor weather or fire danger.

  • Park entry fees:

    $8 per vehicle per day applies at Girrakool and Somersby Falls picnic areas. The park has coin-operated pay and display machines - please bring correct coins.

    Other fees:

    You will need a permit to hold a wedding or undertake commercial photography within the park.

    Buy a pass
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See more visitor info

Get involved

Woy Woy Bay bushcare

Woy Woy Bay bushcare

Woy Woy Bay is nestled in the backwater of Brisbane Water National Park. The Woy Woy bushcare group gathers there once a month to weed and restore part of the open forest community. Volunteer to be part of this rewarding bush regeneration experience in the Gosford area.

Warrah lookout, Brisbane Water National Park. Photo: Kevin McGrath