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Wallumatta loop trail

Wallumatta Nature Reserve

Overview

For an easy family getaway in Sydney, Wallumatta loop trail offers walking, birdwatching and bush regeneration in Wallumatta Nature Reserve, near Ryde.

Where
Wallumatta Nature Reserve
Distance
0.6km loop
Time suggested
15 - 45min
Grade
Grade 3
Price
Free
What to
bring
Hat, sunscreen, drinking water
Please note
Remember to take your binoculars if you want to go bird watching.

If you sometimes hanker for a nature getaway without leaving town, then Wallumatta loop trail offers an idyllic bush setting within easy reach of the Sydney CBD. Close to public transport options between Ryde and Lane Cove, this historic stand of remnant forest provides a great family walk and is popular with those who are keen on nature, bush regeneration and birdwatching.

Following the clearly signposted walking track, you’ll encounter towering turpentine and ironbark forest that attract botanists, school excursions and dedicated bushcare groups.

A perfect getaway from a hectic schedule, enjoy this short loop walk any time of year. Keep an eye out for the masked lapwing, black-shouldered kite and vibrant sacred kingfisher. In spring, when the plants are in flower, you might spot the nectar-loving yellow-faced honeyeater.

For directions, safety and practical information, see visitor info

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A family walk a boardwalk section of Bouddi coastal walk, Bouddi National Park. Photo: John Spencer/OEH.

Conservation program:

Saving our Species conservation program

Saving our Species is an innovative conservation program in NSW. This program aims to secure as many threatened species that can be secured in the wild as possible, for the next 100 years.

Mountain pygmy possum (Burramys parvus). Photo: Cate Aitken
Wildflowers, Wallumatta loop trail. Photo: John Spencer