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Jenolan River walking track

Jenolan Karst Conservation Reserve

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Overview

Jenolan River walking track and Blue Lake closed

Jenolan River walking track was damaged by fire and floods between 2020-2022. This track is closed while we upgrade and improve facilities at Jenolan Karst Conservation Reserve.

Jenolan River walking track and Blue Lake are closed after being damaged by fire and floods between 2020 and 2022. The track will re-open after infrastructure upgrades allow for a safe walking experience.

Distance
2.6km return
Time suggested
45min - 1hr 30min
Grade
Grade 3
Please note
  • Swimming is prohibited in Blue Lake, as it's an important platypus habitat. You can swim at the waterhole downstream, below the waterfall along Jenolan River walk.
  • Check with the ticket office for walking track advice or closures before you set out.

Jenolan River walking track takes in amazing Blue Lake, waterfalls, bridges and Jenolan Caves' hydro-electric heritage. Also called Working Waters walk, it's great for bird watching and wildlife spotting.

It’s hard not to feel energised by the natural beauty along Jenolan River walking track. Also known as Working Waters walk, this easy walk at Jenolan Caves is suitable for almost everyone, all year round.

Starting from the eastern side of Grand Arch the track provides great views looking back up to Carlotta Arch, as it traces the edge of beautiful Blue Lake. See if you can spot the trout ladder next to the hydro hut, or glimpse the lake's resident platypus.

To make the most of this walk, why not pack a picnic lunch to enjoy beside the vibrant waters of Blue Lake.

Continue beyond the lake's weir, following the Jenolan River through woodland downstream. Detour to the bottom of the small waterfall and swimming hole. While you can't swim in Blue Lake, you can enjoy a dip at this scenic spot.

For a shorter walk, return to Grand Arch. Or, follow the track further downstream along the hillside to reach the old Jenolan Hydro Electric Power Station and picnic area.

Bird watchers are in for a treat, with bellbirds, rock warblers and lyrebirds often spotted amongst the area’s woodland. Goannas, kangaroos, wallabies and eastern water dragons are also never far away.

For directions, safety and practical information, see visitor info

Also see

  • A close-up view of the bumpy rock formations of Carlotta Arch in Jenolan Karst Conservation Reserve. Photo: Jenolan Caves © DPE

    Carlotta Arch walking track

    Short but steep Carlotta Arch walking track, also called Shaping Waters walk, offers fantastic views of limestone formations and beautiful Blue Lake, at Jenolan Caves.

  • Two brush-tailed rock wallabies sit on rocks in Jenolan Karst Conservation Reserve. Photo: Jenolan Caves © DPE

    McKeown's Valley walking track

    McKeown's Valley walking track, also known as Healing Waters walk, is a short and easy return walk at Jenolan Caves offering fantastic karst landscapes and wildlife spotting in the Blue Mountains.

  • A group of visitors admire a pool of water in a limestone cave at Jenolan Caves. Photo: Jenolan Caves © DPE

    Jenolan Caves guided tours

    Book in for a tour of Jenolan Caves, in the Oberon area. Whether you're staying at the caves or visiting from the Blue Mountains or Sydney, it's worth the trip to see the world's oldest cave system.

  • Exterior shot of Jenolan Caves House lit up at night, Jenolan Karst Conservation Reserve. Photo: Jenolan Caves © DPE

    Jenolan Caves House

    Enjoy old world charm at iconic Jenolan Caves House, in the heart of Jenolan Karst Conservation Reserve. Stay at this historic grand hotel as you explore the spectacular caves and walks, near Oberon.

 

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A family walk a boardwalk section of Bouddi coastal walk, Bouddi National Park. Photo: John Spencer/OEH.

Conservation program:

Jenolan environmental monitoring program

The Jenolan environmental monitoring program, created in 2008, uses special sensory equipment to measure tiny variations in air and water quality at different sites around the karst environment of Jenolan Caves. While still allowing visitors to explore the caves, this allows scientists to protect geodiversity, ensuring conditions stay stable for future generations.

Visitors inside Jenolan Caves, Jenolan Karst Conservation Reserve. Photo: J Lim