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Mother of Ducks Lagoon birdwatching platform

Mother of Ducks Lagoon Nature Reserve

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Learn more about why this park is special

Mother of Ducks Lagoon birdwatching platform is in Mother of Ducks Lagoon Nature Reserve. Here are just some of the reasons why this park is special:

A changing world

Bird watching platform, Mother of Ducks Lagoon Nature Reserve. Photo: John Spencer

The beautiful Mother of Ducks Lagoon has a complex history. Over the years, it’s been drained for pastoral purposes, among others, and has suffered the effects of drought. It’s fascinating to imagine that years ago much of it would probably have been underwater.

Many species call this home

Bird watching platform, Mother of Ducks Lagoon Nature Reserve. Photo: John Spencer

With over 87 species observed in and around it, Mother of Ducks Lagoon Nature Reserve is a major bird habitat. You’ll also see black swans, wading ibis and cormorants diving for fish. Several endangered, threatened and vulnerable bird species rely on the reserve for survival, including the curlew sandpiper and grey falcon. You might even see one of the many reptiles recorded in the park, such as the common snake-necked tortoise or the endangered Booroolong frog. With so many migratory birds calling it home at least part of the year, the reserve has real international significance. Mother of Ducks Lagoon Nature Reserve features birds protected under international agreements between Australia and Japan, China and Korea.


Wetlands full of life

Wetlands, Mother of Ducks Lagoon Nature Reserve. Photo: John Spencer

There’s more to wetlands than birds, of course. The lagoon abounds with lush plant life, including tall spike-rush, common pondweed, Australian sweet grass and even carnivorous plants. Look carefully to see rare woodruff growing on the levee bank.

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Lagoon shore, Mother of Ducks Lagoon Nature Reserve birdwatching platform. Photo: John Spencer