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McKeown Valley walking track

Jenolan Karst Conservation Reserve

Overview

Take McKeown Valley walking track, or Healing Waters walk, to experience the Jenolan Caves area and surface karst features within Blue Mountains.

Where
Jenolan Karst Conservation Reserve
Distance
2.6km return
Time suggested
1hr 30min - 2hrs
Grade
Grade 3
Price
Free
What to
bring
Hat, sunscreen, drinking water
Please note
The section of road into Jenolan Valley is one-way from 11.45am to 1.15pm every day to allow coaches to enter Jenolan safely. Take Oberon Road if you’re leaving Jenolan between these times.

For a bushwalk incorporating a scenic combination of karst features, diverse landscapes and abundant wildlife, you can’t go past McKeown Valley walking track.

This track, also known as Healing Waters walk, takes in a range of different settings, and leads you into the incredible Devil's Coach House cave, through the pretty McKeowns Valley, and onto the historic Old Playing Fields, where you can check out the old concrete cricket pitch.

As you follow this bushwalking track, you’ll see some amazing surface karst features, including a blind valley. You may want to stop at the campground at the end of the walk for a snack, or reward yourself with a terrace lunch at Caves House.

Plenty of wildlife can also be spotted on this easy walk around Jenolan Caves. Kangaroos, wallabies and lyrebirds are just some of the area’s daytime visitors, while an evening walk allows you to see and hear owls, sugargliders and possums.

For directions, safety and practical information, see visitor info

 

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A family walk a boardwalk section of Bouddi coastal walk, Bouddi National Park. Photo: John Spencer/OEH.

Conservation program:

Jenolan environmental monitoring program

The Jenolan environmental monitoring program, created in 2008, uses special sensory equipment to measure tiny variations in air and water quality at different sites around the karst environment of Jenolan Caves. While still allowing visitors to explore the caves, this allows scientists to protect geodiversity, ensuring conditions stay stable for future generations.

Visitors inside Jenolan Caves, Jenolan Karst Conservation Reserve. Photo: J Lim
McKeown Valley walk, Jenolan Karst Conservation Reserve. Photo: Jenolan Caves Trust