Back to previous page
Print factsheet
Special Offer

Waterbird Lagoon open: Gwydir Wetlands

Gwydir Wetlands State Conservation Area

Overview

Keen birdwatchers won't want to miss this event in Gwydir Wetlands State Conservation Area, near Moree. It's one of NSW's most significant inland wetland systems, and home to a variety of birds.

When

Open daily from sunrise to sunset, Monday 1 April to Sunday 30 June 2019. Daytime temperatures are very hot, so the best times to visit are early morning and early evening.

Where
Gwydir Wetlands State Conservation Area
Accessibility
No wheelchair access
Grade
Medium. Suitable for all ages. Supervise children closely around the water. Due to conditions at Bunnor bird hide, the elderly and people with impaired mobility may find access difficult.
Price
Free
Meeting point
Bunnor bird hide and picnic area.
What to
bring
Drinking water, binoculars, hat, sunscreen, insect repellent
Bookings
Bookings not required. For more information, call the NSW National Parks and Wildlife Service Narrabri office on 02 6792 7300.

From the elevated bird hide, on the edge of the semi-permanent Waterbird Lagoon, you might see:

  • Glossy and straw-necked ibis, whistling ducks, nankeen night herons and white-bellied sea eagles
  • Many varieties of egrets and cormorants
  • Magpie geese, brolgas and black-necked storks (jabirus).

Remember to bring plenty of drinking water, food and cooking equipment (if needed), binoculars, field guides (for bird identification), a camera, hat, sunscreen and insect repellent. You can also wade around the edges of the waterhole. The picnic area (approx. 200m from the bird hide) has undercover picnic tables and toilet facilities.

Camping is not permitted onsite, but you can arrange accommodation in Moree or at local farm stays. Check road and water conditions with the Moree Visitor Information Centre before you travel out to the reserve. Call the visitor information centre on 02 6757 3350.

For directions, safety and practical information, see visitor info

Park info

Leaves on the ground. Photo:John Yurasek