Toorooroo campground

Morton National Park

Overview

Go birdwatching, fishing or bushwalking from Toorooroo campground in Morton National Park. Close to Nowra, it’s your best choice for rustic Shoalhaven camping.

Accommodation Details
Number of campsites 3
Camping type Tent, Camping beside my vehicle
Facilities Picnic tables, barbecue facilities, carpark
Price Free.
Entry fees Park entry fees apply
Bookings

Bookings are not available for this campground.

Please note
  • Sites are not marked or powered
  • This is a remote campground, so please make sure you arrive well-prepared.

This small bush campground is a great spot to camp overnight before discovering beautiful Morton National Park and the former gold-mining town of Yalwal.

Depending on the time of year, you may be lucky enough to have this campground to yourself. It’s a real gem of a place, too – close to the water and set amongst gorgeous wattle forest and red gums. Its three sites are unpowered, but the adjoining picnic area is well-equipped with an amenities block, picnic tables, barbecues and fire rings.

Use Toorooroo campground as your personal base when exploring Morton’s magnificent Ettrema wilderness region. Beyond this, the area offers many ways to reacquaint yourself with nature. Head off on a bushwalk or jog, go birdwatching, wildlife-spotting, or try a spot of freshwater fishing. Go mountain biking or 4WD touring. And if you still find yourself with free time, a shady patch of grass is the perfect setting for some holiday reading or an afternoon nap.

For directions, safety and practical information, see visitor info

Current alerts in this area

There are no current alerts in this area.

Local alerts

For the latest updates on fires, closures and other alerts in this area, see https://www.nationalparks.nsw.gov.au/camping-and-accommodation/campgrounds/toorooroo-campground/local-alerts

Operated by

Park info

See more visitor info

Visitor info

All the practical information you need to know about Toorooroo campground.

Getting there and parking

Toorooroo campground is in the Yalwal precinct of Morton National Park. To get there from Nowra:

  • Drive west on Yalwal Road for approximately 25km
  • Once you reach the town of Yalwal, you’ll see Toorooroo campground on the right, just before Yarramunmun Creek.

Road quality

Check the weather before you set out as the road to this campground can become boggy when it rains.

  • Unsealed roads

Vehicle access

  • 2WD vehicles (no long vehicle access)

Weather restrictions

  • 4WD required in wet weather

Parking

 Parking is available at Toorooroo campground.

Best times to visit

There are lots of great things waiting for you in Morton National Park. Here are some of the highlights.

Autumn

Grab an oar and canoe down the Shoalhaven River or the Kangaroo River. Autumn rains create ideal conditions for river paddling, and you'll find good spots for beginners as well as for more experienced paddlers.

Spring

Take the Three Views or Granite Falls walking tracks to see wildflowers in colourful bloom.

Summer

The rainforests of Morton National Park are a great place to escape the summer heat – try the Erith Coal Mine track at Bundanoon or the nearby Fairy Bower Falls walk.

Facilities

  • Water is not available at this campground, so you'll need to bring your own supply for drinking and cooking.
  • Rubbish bins are not available – please take rubbish with you when leaving.

Picnic tables

Barbecue facilities

  • Wood barbecues (bring your own firewood)
  • Fire rings (bring your own firewood)

Carpark

Maps and downloads

Safety messages

Camping safety

Whether you're pitching your tent on the coast or up on the mountains, there are many things to consider when camping in NSW national parks. Find out how to stay safe when camping.

Fire safety

During periods of fire weather, the Commissioner of the NSW Rural Fire Service may declare a total fire ban for particular NSW fire areas, or statewide. Learn more about total fire bans and fire safety.

Mobile safety

Dial Triple Zero (000) in an emergency. Download the Emergency + app before you visit, it helps emergency services locate you using your smartphone's GPS. Please note there is limited mobile phone reception in this park and you’ll need mobile reception to call Triple Zero (000).

River and lake safety

The aquatic environment around rivers, lakes and lagoons can be unpredictable. If you're visiting these areas, take note of these river and lake safety tips.

Accessibility

Disability access level - hard

  • Wheelchairs can access this area with some difficulty

Prohibited

Noise restrictions apply at this campground.

Pets

Pets and domestic animals (other than certified assistance animals) are not permitted. Find out which regional parks allow dog walking and see the pets in parks policy for more information.

Smoking

NSW national parks are no smoking areas.

Visitor centre

Nearby towns

Bowral (27 km)

Spring is tulip time while summer has fragrant roses and autumn, flowering bulbs. Bowral Tulip Festival runs from the end of September until early October; the Autumn Garden Festival is held in May.

www.visitnsw.com

Kangaroo Valley (20 km)

Kangaroo Valley is a National Trust-listed village nestled between the Cambewarra and Barrengarry mountains. Less than two hours from Canberra and Sydney, Kangaroo Valley is one of the state's hidden gems. With a backdrop of rainforest greens, picturesque mountains, rolling pastures, lush valleys, and the Kangaroo River, Kangaroo Valley offers the perfect escape from the bustle of city life.

www.visitnsw.com

Nowra (6 km)

Nowra is a historic city and the commercial heart of the Shoalhaven. It's on the Shoalhaven River close to beaches and national parks.

www.visitnsw.com

Learn more

Toorooroo campground is in Morton National Park. Here are just some of the reasons why this park is special:

A rugged beauty

West Rim walking track, Morton National Park. Photo: Michael Van Ewijk

Morton National Park envelops you in its fascinating landscape. Roam through rainforest on the Kangaroo Valley escarpment. Or relax on your picnic blanket, shaded by tall eucalyptus trees - the park has everything from Sydney peppermint to spotted gum and the rare Pigeon House Ash. The park's geological features are equally captivating. Detect different rock types in the cliff face, or find a good vantage point and gaze at the plateau carved with deep gorges. Absorbing the gorges sheer size, coupled with their interesting terraced appearance, can keep you occupied for hours.

  • Badgerys Spur walking track Badgerys Spur walking track in Morton National Park offers a steep and challenging hike on the edge of Ettrema Wilderness Area, finishing on the banks of Shoalhaven River.
  • Granite Falls walking track The easy Granite Falls walking track in Morton National Park, near Nowra, offers scenic waterfall views with springtime wildflowers. Enjoy a picnic by the lookout.

Rich Aboriginal history

View of Morton National Park. Photo: John Yurasek

Morton National Park is the traditional Country of the Yuin people. Several hundred Aboriginal sites have been recorded here and there are likely many more. The park's imposing mountains, particularly Didthul, are particularly significant in Aboriginal mythology, as is the majestic Fitzroy Falls. The park's plateau and surrounding country also contain sites of great importance to Aboriginal people, whose occupation of the area dates back over 20,000 years.

  • Fitzroy Falls Visitor Centre The award-winning Fitzroy Falls Visitor Centre offers information on the region’s local Aboriginal culture, wildlife and birdwatching, in the Southern Highlands.
  • Then and now: Aboriginal culture This excursion experience has been updated and is now being delivered in line with the new NSW Department of Education Curriculum. We will be revising this excursion's name and information online soon. Contact your local national parks office for more information about the updated excursion.
  • Then and now: Aboriginal culture This excursion experience has been updated and is now being delivered in line with the new NSW Department of Education Curriculum. We will be revising this excursion's name and information online soon. Contact your local national parks office for more information about the updated excursion.

Teeming with wildlife

Honeysuckle (Banksia serrata), Morton National Park. Photo: John Yurasek

This massive park is a sanctuary for all kinds of wildlife. Rainforest and moist eucalypt forest support swamp wallabies, gliders, bush rats and long-nosed potoroos. Birdwatchers will be tickled pink with Morton's residents - satin bowerbirds, green catbirds and lyrebirds call the park home, while eagles and falcons hover overhead. You could be fortunate enough to see an endangered ground parrot in the heath. And, if it really is your lucky day, maybe you'll meet a platypus or long-necked tortoise in one of the rivers.

  • Biodiversity month: Talks at Fitzroy Falls September is Biodiversity month. Visit Fitzroy Falls Visitor Centre in Morton National Park to hear free talks by conservation experts. Be inspired by their passion for helping threatened species.
  • East Rim and Wildflower walking tracks Take in awe inspiring views of the Southern Highlands’ on East Rim and Wildflower walking tracks. Start from the Fitzroy Falls Visitor Centre and wind your way through nature on these joined tracks.
  • Manning lookout For spectacular cliff-top views over Kangaroo Valley, Manning lookout offers great birdwatching on a family driving route through the NSW Southern Highlands, in Morton National Park.
  • Pigeon House Mountain Didthul picnic area Pigeon House Mountain Didthul picnic area offers basic facilities as well as terrific birdwatching and a walking track up the mountain to a scenic lookout.

Plants and animals you may see

Animals

  • Yellow-tailed black cockatoo. Photo: Peter Sherratt

    Yellow-tailed black cockatoo (Calyptorhynchus funereus)

    The yellow-tailed black cockatoo is one of the largest species of parrot. With dusty-black plumage, they have a yellow tail and cheek patch. They’re easily spotted while bird watching, as they feed on seeds in native forests and pine plantations.

  • Closeup of a laughing kookaburra's head and body. Photo: Rosie Nicolai/OEH

    Kookaburra (Dacelo novaeguineae)

    Of the 2 species of kookaburra found in Australia, the laughing kookaburra is the best-known and the largest of the native kingfishers. With its distinctive riotous call, the laughing kookaburra is commonly heard in open woodlands and forests throughout NSW national parks, making these ideal spots for bird watching.

Plants

  •  Black sheoak. Photo: Barry Collier

    Black sheoak (Allocasuarina littoralis)

    The black sheoak is one of a number of casuarina species found across the east coast of Australia and nearby tablelands. Growing to a height of 5-15m, these hardy Australian native plants can survive in poor or sandy soils. The barrel-shaped cone of the black sheoak grows to 10-30mm long.

  • Blueberry ash. Photo: Jaime Plaza

    Blueberry ash (Elaeocarpus reticulatus)

    The blueberry ash is a rainforest shrub which produces blue olive-shaped berries and spectacular bell-shaped flowers, which often appear on the plant together. It is a tall slender shrub or small tree found in rainforest, tall eucalypt forest and coastal bushland in eastern NSW, south-east Queensland and Victoria.

  • Grass trees, Sugarloaf State Conservation Area. Photo: Michael Van Ewijk

    Grass tree (Xanthorrea spp.)

    An iconic part of the Australian landscape, the grass tree is widespread across eastern NSW. These Australian native plants have a thick fire-blackened trunk and long spiked leaves. They are found in heath and open forests across eastern NSW. The grass tree grows 1-5m in height and produces striking white-flowered spikes which grow up to 1m long.

Environments in this park

Education resources (1)

School excursions (4)

Toorooroo campground, Morton National Park. Photo: Michael Van Ewijk