Bouddi National Park

Overview

Bouddi National Park is located near Gosford on the New South Wales Central Coast. You'll find several great walks, as well as opportunities for camping, swimming and fishing.

Read more about Bouddi National Park

Located on the Central Coast near Gosford, north of Sydney, the beautiful Bouddi National Park offers spectacular diverse landscapes - from beaches and steep cliffs through to rainforest and heathland.

Make the most of the park’s coastal location and camp at Little Beach, Putty Beach or Tallow Beach campground. Go swimming, fishing or whale watching. Explore the cycling trails or take in sweeping views from the lookouts and coastal walks, including the well-known Bouddi Coastal walk.

Bouddi National Park is home to countless attractions, including one of Australia’s first marine protected areas, significant Aboriginal sites, wildlife and wildflowers, and even an old paddle steamer wreck. It's a great getaway for a weekend or a week.

Current alerts in this area

There are no current alerts in this area.

Local alerts

For the latest updates on fires, closures and other alerts in this area, see https://www.nationalparks.nsw.gov.au/visit-a-park/parks/bouddi-national-park/local-alerts

Contact

See more visitor info

Visitor info

All the practical information you need to know about Bouddi National Park.

Getting there and parking

Get driving directions

Get directions

    From Sydney

    • Follow the F3 and take the Gosford exit.
    • Follow the signs to Woy Woy, then Kincumber.
    • Take Maitland Bay Drive, then Empire Bay Drive.
    • Look for The Scenic Road at Killcare Heights and take Putty Beach Road.

    Driving from Gosford

    • Follow the Central Coast Highway towards Erina. Turn right onto Avoca Drive and continue through Kincumber.
    • Turn right at Empire Bay Drive and take Scenic Road

    Park entry points

    Parking

    Road quality

    • Sealed roads

    Vehicle access

    • 2WD vehicles

    Weather restrictions

    • All weather

    By bike

    Check out the Bicycle information for NSW website for more information.

    By public transport

    For information about public transport options, visit the NSW transport info website

    Best times to visit

    Spring

    Take the Bouddi Coastal walk to be amazed by the colourful wildflowers on display in spring.

    Summer

    Cool off with a dip at one the park's gorgeous beaches or try snorkelling at Maitland Bay Surf the popular coastline between MacMasters Beach and Box Head .

    Winter

    Grab the camera and spot humpback whales as they migrate north between May and July.

    Weather, temperature and rainfall

    Summer temperature

    Average

    20°C and 26°C

    Highest recorded

    42.4°C

    Winter temperature

    Average

    9°C and 17°C

    Lowest recorded

    3.4°C

    Rainfall

    Wettest month

    January to March

    The area’s highest recorded rainfall in one day

    246mm

    Facilities

    Maps and downloads

    Fees and passes

    Park entry fees:

    $8 per vehicle per day in the Putty Beach precinct. The park has coin-operated pay and display machines - please bring correct coins.

    • All Parks Pass - For all parks in NSW (including Kosciuszko NP) $190 (1 year) / $335 (2 years)
    • Multi-Park Pass - For all parks in NSW (except Kosciuszko) $65 (1 year) / $115 (2 years)
    • Country Parks Pass - For all parks in Country NSW (except Kosciuszko) $45 (1 year) / $75 (2 years)
    • Single Country Park Pass - For entry to a single park in country NSW (except Kosciuszko). $22 (1 year) / $40 (2 years)

    Annual passes and entry fees (https://www.nationalparks.nsw.gov.au/passes-and-fees)

    Safety messages

    However you discover NSW national parks and reserves, we want you to have a safe and enjoyable experience. Our park and reserve systems contrast greatly so you need to be aware of the risks and take responsibility for your own safety and the safety of those in your care.

    Please help to preserve the natural environment and cultural sites by observing the following:

    • respecting Aboriginal sites and places
    • all fauna, flora and rock formations are protected
    • use rubbish bins where provided, otherwise take your rubbish with you when you leave
    • please leave your pets at home; they are not permitted in national parks
    • please do not feed native animals as this may make them sick; their food is in the surrounding environment
    • fires are not permitted in coastal parks; free gas barbecues are available at a number of locations.

    Mobile safety

    Dial Triple Zero (000) in an emergency. Download the Emergency + app before you visit, it helps emergency services locate you using your smartphone's GPS. Please note there is limited mobile phone reception in this park and you’ll need mobile reception to call Triple Zero (000).

    Prohibited

    Pets

    Pets and domestic animals (other than certified assistance animals) are not permitted. Find out which regional parks allow dog walking and see the OEH pets in parks policy for more information.

    Smoking

    NSW national parks are no smoking areas.

    Nearby towns

    Killcare (1 km)

    A quiet costal town on the NSW Central Coast, Killcare is a great location for a beach getaway. The surrounding Bouddi National Park offers a variety of walking and cycling tracks, lookouts, picnic and camping areas, as well as secluded beaches such as Putty Beach, Little Beach and Lobster Beach.

    www.visitnsw.com

    Gosford (18 km)

    Gosford is a great destination for a family day trip or holiday. It's situated on Brisbane Water National Park and surrounded by state forests, lakes and beaches.

    www.visitnsw.com

    Sydney City Centre (94 km)

    No trip to Sydney is complete without spending some time in the city’s beautiful parks. Whether it’s in central areas like Hyde Park or the Royal Botanic Gardens or further out in Centennial Parklands, there’s plenty of green space to go out and enjoy.

    www.sydney.com

    Learn more

    Bouddi National Park is a special place. Here are just some of the reasons why:

    Culturally fascinating

    Bouddi Ridge Explorer, Bouddi National Park. Photo: Kevin McGrath

    The park and surrounding area contain numerous Aboriginal sites, more than 100 significant sites have been recorded, with more still likely to be found. Rock shelters adorned with engravings and Aboriginal art, grinding grooves, middens and other archaeological deposits are fascinating to behold, and make a visit to Bouddi National Park a very special experience.

    • Daleys Point walking track Daleys Point walking track offers easy walking, spectacular views and a place to take in the natural beauty and unique Aboriginal cultural heritage of Bouddi National Park.

    A natural paradise

    Daleys Point walking track, Bouddi National Park. Photo: John Yurasek

    A variety of animals and birds live in Bouddi National Park, enjoying its quiet beaches and native vegetation as much as its visitors do. Remember to take your camera as you may be lucky enough to spot a resident sea-eagle, echidna or tree frog. Plus, photos of the park's fascinating rock formations provide excellent memories of your visit. The 300-hectare Bouddi National Park Marine Extension protects the park’s diverse marine life and is one of Australia’s earliest Marine Protected Areas. The park also offers great whale watching opportunities from one of its many lookouts– spot humpback whales between May and July and again in September and October and southern right whales from late July.


    • Box Head track This easy walk winds through bushland to the Box Head lookout, offering scenic views across the Hawkesbury River and cross Broken Bay and Lion Island to Sydney.
    • Gerrin Point lookout Experience stunning views at Gerrin Point Lookout, a short walk from Putty Beach in Bouddi National Park on the NSW central coast. Enjoy whale watching during the winter months, birdwatching or just absorb the view.

    A coastal gem

    Mount Bouddi walking track, Bouddi National Park. Photo: John Spencer

    Located south-east of Gosford, the park spans over 1,500 hectares, including the fully-protected Bouddi National Park Marine Extension area. As well as offering pristine beaches and marine habitat, the park's coastal position boasts million-dollar ocean views, which are best enjoyed from one of its lookouts.

    • Bouddi coastal walk Located near Gosford, Bouddi coastal walk is known for its beaches, boardwalk and birdlife. Go whale watching, picnic or swim at Maitland Bay, or simply absorb the ocean views.
    • Gerrin Point lookout Experience stunning views at Gerrin Point Lookout, a short walk from Putty Beach in Bouddi National Park on the NSW central coast. Enjoy whale watching during the winter months, birdwatching or just absorb the view.

    So many outdoor activities

    Gerrin Point lookout, Bouddi National Park. Photo: Nick Cubbin

    Bouddi National Park is the perfect place to enjoy the great outdoors – both in water and on land. From abundant walking tracks, mountain biking trails, fishing spots, campsites, picnic areas and beaches just waiting for swimmers, surfers and snorkellers, this park really does have it all. You can even join an adventure tour.

    • Bouddi coastal walk Located near Gosford, Bouddi coastal walk is known for its beaches, boardwalk and birdlife. Go whale watching, picnic or swim at Maitland Bay, or simply absorb the ocean views.
    • Bouddi Ridge explorer Try the awesome Bouddi Ridge Explorer mountain biking trail in Bouddi National Park near Gosford. Looping several smaller track the 10km trail offers great variety and scenery.
    • Maitland Bay track Maitland Bay track is one of the central coast's most popular bushwalks. This short, steep walk takes you downhill to the beautiful Maitland Bay and its shipwreck.

    Plants and animals you may see

    Animals

    • White-bellied sea eagle. Photo: John Turbill

      White-bellied sea eagle (Haliaeetus leucogaster)

      White-bellied sea eagles can be easily identified by their white tail and dark grey wings. These raptors are often spotted cruising the coastal breezes throughout Australia, and make for some scenic bird watching. Powerful Australian birds of prey, they are known to mate for life, and return each year to the same nest to breed.

    • Superb fairy wren. Photo: Ingo Oeland

      Superb fairy wren (Malurus cyaneus)

      The striking blue and black plumage of the adult male superb fairy wren makes for colourful bird watching across south-eastern Australia. The sociable superb fairy wrens, or blue wrens, are Australian birds living in groups consisting of a dominant male, mouse-brown female ‘jenny wrens’ and several tawny-brown juveniles.

    • Sugar glider. Photo: Jeff Betteridge

      Sugar glider (Petaurus breviceps)

      The sugar glider is a tree-dwelling Australian native marsupial, found in tall eucalypt forests and woodlands along eastern NSW. The nocturnal sugar glider feeds on insects and birds, and satisfies its sweet tooth with nectar and pollens.

    Plants

    • Wonga Wonga vine. Photo: Barry Collier

      Wonga wonga vine (Pandorea pandorana)

      The wonga wonga vine is a widespread vigorous climber usually found along eastern Australia. A variation of the plant occurs in the central desert, where it resembles a sprawling shrub. One of the more common Australian native plants, the wonga wonga vine produces bell-shaped white or yellow flowers in the spring, followed by a large oblong-shaped seed pod.

    • Smooth-barked apple. Photo: Jaime Plaza

      Smooth-barked apple (Angophora costata)

      Smooth-barked apple gums, also known as Sydney red gum or rusty gum trees, are Australian native plants found along the NSW coast, and in the Sydney basin and parts of Queensland. Growing to heights of 15-30m, the russet-coloured angophoras shed their bark in spring to reveal spectacular new salmon-coloured bark.

    Environments in this park

    Education resources (1)

    What we're doing

    Bouddi National Park has management strategies in place to protect and conserve the values of this park. Visit the OEH website for detailed park and fire management documents. Here is just some of the work we’re doing to conserve these values:

    Preserving biodiversity

    Bouddi National Park embraces efforts to support the biodiversity of its flora and fauna. Field studies and periods of concentrated surveying are carried out in this park in order to maintain this.

    Conservation program

    BioNet

    Uniting technology with the vast collection of information on biodiversity in NSW, BioNet is a valuable database open to any user. From individual plant sightings to detailed scientific surveys, it offers a wealth of knowledge about ecology and threatened species in NSW. 

    Managing weeds, pest animals and other threats

    Pests and weeds have a significant impact to the ecosystems within Bouddi National Park. Risk assessments for new and emerging weeds are carried out as an ongoing initiative within this park. As a priority of NPWS, the management of weeds such as bitou bush and boneseed along with pest management of foxes and wild dogs are an important part of the work undertaken in Bouddi to protect the integrity of biodiversity which exists in the area.

    Conservation program

    Bitou bush threat abatement plan

    Bitou bush poses a serious and widespread threat to threatened species populations and ecological communities on the NSW coast. The NPWS bitou bush threat abatement plan helps to reduce the impact of weeds at priority sites using control measures such as ground spraying, aerial spraying, biological control and physical removal.

    Developing visitor facilities and experiences

    Bouddi National Park undertakes regular maintenance of its facilities. Replacement and installation of infrastructure around barbecues, picnic and sheltered areas takes place in this park. Improvements to information signage are also a priority.

    Conservation program

    Tour guide and visitor services volunteer program

    When you sign up to volunteer for tour guiding and visitor services, you’ll be doing something for yourself as well as for the benefit of visitors to NSW national parks.

    Conserving our Aboriginal culture

    Aboriginal culture is of great value to NPWS, and the conditions of Aboriginal sites and assets are monitored and upgraded as required in Bouddi National Park. In doing this, NPWS works in conjunction with local Aboriginal communities wherever possible.

    Managing fire

    NSW is one of the most bushfire prone areas in the world as a result of our climate, weather systems, vegetation and the rugged terrain. NPWS is committed to maintaining natural and cultural heritage values and minimising the likelihood and impact of bushfires via a strategic program of fire research, fire planning, hazard reduction, highly trained rapid response firefighting crews and community alerts.

    Conservation program

    Hazard reduction program

    Managing fire-prone NSW national parks requires a three-pronged approach, including fire planning, community education, and fuel management. When it comes to fuel like dead wood, NPWS conducts planned hazard reduction activities like mowing and controlled burning to assist in the protection of life, property and community.

    Sunset, Putty Beach campground, Bouddi National Park. Photo: John Yurasek