Yarrangobilly Village campground

Yarrangobilly area in Kosciuszko National Park

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Overview

Yarrangobilly Village campground offers riverside camping for caravan or trailers with great fishing, walking and historic heritage in Kosciuszko National Park.

Accommodation Details
Camping type Tent, Camper trailer site, Caravan site, Camping beside my vehicle
Facilities Picnic tables, barbecue facilities, carpark, toilets
What to bring Firewood, fuel stove
Price Free. There are no camping fees at this campground but a $6 booking fee applies.
Entry fees

Park entry fees don't apply to access this campground

Bookings Bookings are required. Book online or call the National Parks Contact Centre on 1300 072 757.
Please note
  • There are no marked sites.
  • There's limited mobile reception in this area of the park.
  • Weather in this area can be extreme and unpredictable, so please ensure you're well-prepared for your visit.
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Yarrangobilly Village campground is ideal for a touring holiday of Kosciuszko National Park and offers a great base for walking, fishing, as well as exploring the historic and natural wonders in the northern precinct of the park. This picturesque riverside camping spot is located beside historic Cotterill’s Cottage, the oldest building in Kosciuszko National Park.

Set among grassy woodlands, just off the highway, it has easy parking for caravans and trailers. The campground is just off Snowy Mountains Highway, 7.5km north of the Yarrangobilly Caves entrance road.

Set on the banks of meandering Yarrangabilly River, try your hand at fishing or enjoy a leisurely picnic. You might spot a few eastern grey kangaroos grazing or relaxing in the shade.

For directions, safety and practical information, see visitor info

Current alerts in this area

There are no current alerts in this area.

Local alerts

For the latest updates on fires, closures and other alerts in this area, see https://www.nationalparks.nsw.gov.au/camping-and-accommodation/campgrounds/yarrangobilly-village-campground/local-alerts

Bookings

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Park info

See more visitor info

Visitor info

All the practical information you need to know about Yarrangobilly Village campground.

Getting there and parking

Yarrangobilly Village campground is in the northern precinct of Kosciuszko National Park. To get there:

 From Tumut:

  • Travel 62km south along Snowy Mountains Highway
  • The campground is near the highway where it crosses Yarrangobilly River, before you reach the turnoff to Yarrangobilly Caves

From Cooma:

  • Take the Snowy Mountains Highway and continue for around 118km
  • The campground is on the Highway, around 7.5km north of the Yarrangobilly Caves turnoff

Road quality

  • Yarrangobilly Caves entrance and exit roads are graded gravel. They're suitable for 2WD and 4WD vehicles up to 12.5m in length, however the Roads and Maritime Service (RMS) advise that the roads are unsuitable for caravans.
  • RMS recommends snow chains are carried by all vehicles driving in the park in winter, including 4WD and AWD, in case of extreme weather. Visit the Live Traffic website for road conditions.

  • Unsealed roads

Vehicle access

  • 2WD vehicles

Weather restrictions

  • Snow chains required after snow

Parking

Parking is available at Yarrangobilly Village campground.

Facilities

  • River water is available at this campground - you'll need to treat or boil it before drinking.
  • We encourage you to bring gas or fuel stoves, especially in summer during fire season.
  • The nearest food and fuel facilities are available 20km to the west in Talbingo.

Toilets

  • Non-flush toilets

Picnic tables

Barbecue facilities

  • Wood barbecues (bring your own firewood)

Carpark

Maps and downloads

Safety messages

Alpine safety

Alpine areas present special safety issues. Conditions can be extreme and may change rapidly, particularly in winter. It’s important to be prepared and find out how to stay safe in alpine areas.

Camping safety

Whether you're pitching your tent on the coast or up on the mountains, there are many things to consider when camping in NSW national parks. Find out how to stay safe when camping.

Fire safety

During periods of fire weather, the Commissioner of the NSW Rural Fire Service may declare a total fire ban for particular NSW fire areas, or statewide. Learn more about total fire bans and fire safety.

Fishing safety

Fishing from a boat, the beach or by the river is a popular activity for many national park visitors. If you’re planning a day out fishing, check out these fishing safety tips.

Mobile safety

Dial Triple Zero (000) in an emergency. Download the Emergency Plus app before you visit, it helps emergency services locate you using your smartphone's GPS. Please note there is limited mobile phone reception in this park and you’ll need mobile reception to call Triple Zero (000).

River and lake safety

The aquatic environment around rivers, lakes and lagoons can be unpredictable. If you're visiting these areas, take note of these river and lake safety tips.

Yarrangobilly River may be deep and fast-flowing, so please supervise children at all times.

Permitted

Fishing

A current NSW recreational fishing licence is required when fishing in all waters.

Prohibited

Drones

Flying a drone for recreational purposes is prohibited in this area. Drones may affect public enjoyment, safety and privacy, interfere with park operations, or pose a threat to wildlife. See the Drones in Parks policy.

This area may be a declared Drone Exclusion Zone, or may be subject to Civil Aviation Safety Authority (CASA) rules for flying near airports, aerodromes and helicopter landing sites. See CASA's Drone Flyer Rules.

Commercial filming and photography

Commercial filming or photography is prohibited without prior consent. You must apply for permission and contact the local office.

Pets

Pets and domestic animals (other than certified assistance animals) are not permitted. Find out which regional parks allow dog walking and see the pets in parks policy for more information.

Smoking

NSW national parks are no smoking areas.

Visitor centre

Learn more

Yarrangobilly Village campground is in Yarrangobilly area. Here are just some of the reasons why this park is special:

Unique landscapes

Jersey Cave decorations, at Yarrangobilly Caves in Kosciuszko National Park. Photo: E Sheargold/OEH

Yarrangobilly’s karst landscapes were created from a belt of limestone laid down about 440 million years ago. Almost all cave formations can be seen here, from stalactites and stalagmites, hollow straws and delicate helictites, to shawls, cave coral, and massive flowstones. Karst environments are nature’s time capsules, preserving evidence of climate change, floods, droughts, fires, animal and human activity. Over the years, Yarrangobilly's caves have hosted researchers from universities, nuclear science organisations and the Snowy Hydro. You can now visit Harrie Wood Cave, which was closed from 2006-2016, to learn how stalagmites have growth rings, and find out about about climate change monitoring.

  • Jersey Cave This cave is closed until further notice to protect the health and safety of our visitors and staff. Step back in time on a guided tour of Jersey Cave. You'll be awed by some of the most colourful and diverse decorations at Yarrangobilly Caves in Kosciuszko National Park.
  • Jillabenan Cave Take a fascinating guided tour of Jillabenan Cave. It's the smallest and most accessible of the Yarrangobilly Caves in Kosciuszko National Park, but it's packed with incredibly delicate formations.
  • North Glory Cave This cave is closed until further notice to protect the health and safety of our visitors and staff. Explore North Glory Cave by guided tour to glimpse a rarely seen underworld in Kosciuszko National Park.
  • South Glory Cave Take a leisurely self-guided tour through the lofty chambers of South Glory Cave. Absorb the wonders of the largest cave in the Yarrangobilly area of Kosciuszko National Park.

Explore above and below ground

Yarrangobilly Caves Visitor Centre, Kosciuszko National Park. Photo: Elinor Sheargold/OEH

No visit to Yarrangobilly is complete without a visit to its marvellous caves, so stop by the Yarrangobilly Caves Visitor Centre to get your tickets and tour times. The largest, South Glory Cave, allows you to explore at your own pace on a self-guided tour. Jersey and Jillabenan Caves offer guided tours that run 3 or 4 times daily - Jillabenan even boasts wheelchair-access. The visitor centre can also help with tours of other caves, meetings, weddings, custom tours for groups or students from 10 to 100 people. With caves, tours, walks, and the natural mineral waters of the thermal pool to tempt you, you’ll need to stay a few days. Book your own lovingly restored wing or a great-value room at Caves House. Enjoy the creature comforts of Lyrebird Cottage, or set up camp at Yarrangobilly Village campground, just off the Snowy Mountains Highway.

  • Yarrangobilly Caves thermal pool walk Take the short Yarrangobilly Caves thermal pool walk and enjoy a swim in the spring-fed natural pool. It's easily combined with a picnic, bushwalk or cave tour in the Yarrangobilly area of Kosciuszko National Park.
  • Yarrangobilly Caves Visitor Centre Yarrangobilly Caves Visitor Centre is your one stop destination for information on cave tours and tickets, and top tips on where to stay and what to do in the Yarrangobilly and northern areas of Kosciuszko National Park.

A wonderland for wildlife

The endangered smoky mouse. Photo: Linda Broome/OEH

Karst environments are complex ecosystems containing highly specialised plants, animals and micro-organisms. The dense shrubs around Yarrangobilly River provide protection for the endangered smoky mouse, as well as being great for bird watching. At night you might be lucky to see a possum or sugar glider, forest bats, tawny frogmouth owl or even an endangered sooty owl. Don’t be put off if you see algae or even springtime tadpoles in the thermal pool. Algae and weed provide a breeding site for eastern banjo frogs, aka pobblebonks, because of their banjo-like ‘plonk’ or ‘bonk’, meaning the water is clean and healthy. School students can learn more about Kosciuszko National Park’s ecosystems and important biodiversity on a school excursion.

Discover Aboriginal culture

Learning about Aboriginal culture from NPWS rangers, Birrimal Waga Amphitheatre, Tumut. Photo: Murray Vanderveer/NPWS

Yarrangobilly is the perfect place to experience the rich Aboriginal culture of the Wolgalu People. Join a NPWS Aboriginal ranger to see the tools and techniques of the Traditional Owners of this unique landscape. Take part in hands-on activities like string making, or learn how to start a fire without matches. Wolgalu culture tours run on select dates during school holidays, and start from the picnic area near Yarrangobilly Caves Visitor Centre (bookings essential).

  • Aboriginal tools and technology tag-along tour Enjoy a fun-filled day learning about traditional Aboriginal tools and technology in Kosciuszko National Park. Discover the skill of stone axe making and how local plants are turned into food and fibre.
  • Wolgalu Aboriginal culture tour Yarrangobilly is known for its underground caves, but above ground there's an ancient landscape to explore. Join Aboriginal rangers to learn about Wolgalu knowledge and culture.

Plants and animals you may see

Animals

  • Common wombat. Photo: Keith Gillett

    Common wombat (Vombatus ursinus)

    A large, squat marsupial, the Australian common wombat is a burrowing mammal found in coastal forests and mountain ranges across NSW and Victoria. The only other remaining species of wombat in NSW, the endangered southern hairy-nosed wombat, was considered extinct until relatively recently.

  • Eastern water dragon. Photo: Rosie Nicolai

    Eastern water dragon (Intellagama lesueurii lesueurii)

    The eastern water dragon is a subaquatic lizard found in healthy waterways along eastern NSW, from Nowra to halfway up the Cape York Pensinsula. It’s believed to be one of the oldest of Australian reptiles, remaining virtually unchanged for over 20 million years.

  • A juvenile platypus saved by National Parks and Wildlife staff. Photo: M Bannerman/OEH

    Platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus)

    One of the most fascinating and unusual Australian animals, the duck-billed platypus, along with the echidna, are the only known monotremes, or egg-laying mammals, in existence. The platypus is generally found in permanent river systems and lakes in southern and eastern NSW and east and west of the Great Dividing Range.

  • Superb fairy wren. Photo: Michael Van Ewijk

    Superb fairy wren (Malurus cyaneus)

    The striking blue and black plumage of the adult male superb fairy wren makes for colourful bird watching across south-eastern Australia. The sociable superb fairy wrens, or blue wrens, are Australian birds living in groups consisting of a dominant male, mouse-brown female ‘jenny wrens’ and several tawny-brown juveniles.

  •  Superb lyrebird, Minnamurra Rainforest, Budderoo National Park. Photo: David Finnegan

    Superb lyrebird (Menura novaehollandiae)

    With a complex mimicking call and an elaborate courtship dance to match, the superb lyrebird is one of the most spectacular Australian animals. A bird watching must-see, the superb lyrebird can be found in rainforests and wet woodlands across eastern NSW and Victoria.

  • Swamp wallaby in Murramarang National Park. Photo: David Finnegan

    Swamp wallaby (Wallabia bicolor)

    The swamp wallaby, also known as the black wallaby or black pademelon, lives in the dense understorey of rainforests, woodlands and dry sclerophyll forest along eastern Australia. This unique Australian macropod has a dark black-grey coat with a distinctive light-coloured cheek stripe.

Plants

  • Billy Button flowers at Peery Lake picnic area. Photo: Dinitee Haskard OEH

    Billy buttons (Craspedia spp. )

    Billy buttons are attractive Australian native plants that are widespread throughout eastern NSW in dry forest, grassland and alpine regions such as Kosciuszko National Park. The golden-yellow globe-shaped flowers are also known as woollyheads. Related to the daisy, billy buttons are an erect herb growing to a height of 50cm.

Environments in this area