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Belfry Cave tour

Abercrombie Karst Conservation Reserve

Overview

This guided tour of Belfry Cave takes in the upper levels of the Archway at Abercrombie Caves. It's for adventurous spirits – you'll cross a suspension bridge and climb ladders just to get to there!

When

Check with Abercrombie Caves park office for Belfry Cave opening times during school holiday weekends.

Abercrombie Caves open Thursday to Monday (closed Tuesday and Wednesday), and open every day during the NSW school holidays. Closed Christmas Day.

Where
Abercrombie Karst Conservation Reserve
Accessibility
No wheelchair access
Grade
Hard. Suitable for adults and children 7 years and over. Not suitable for children under 7 years. The tour takes about 1 hour.
Price

Adult $33 per person. Senior $30 per person. Pensioner/child $25 per person. Family $83 for 2 adults and 2 children.

Meeting point
Abercrombie Caves park office
Bookings
Bookings not required. For further information email or phone Abercrombie Caves on 02 6368 8603. Limit 12 people. Minimum 2 adults required for tour to run.

You'll gain a real insight into cave formation – Belfry Cave is an extremely high roof chamber with magnificent views. There are narrow squeezes to negotiate.

Entry to Belfry Cave is by guided tour only. It's a good idea to wear sturdy shoes and bring a camera. Bring a packed lunch if you're planning a day at Abercrombie Caves. There is no mobile phone reception in this park.

For directions, safety and practical information, see visitor info

Current alerts in this area

There are no current alerts in this area.

Local alerts

For the latest updates on fires, closures and other alerts in this area, see https://www.nationalparks.nsw.gov.au/things-to-do/guided-tours/belfry-cave-tour/local-alerts

Park info

See more visitor info

Visitor info

All the practical information you need to know about Belfry Cave tour.

Getting there and parking

Get driving directions

Get directions

    From Bathurst:

    • Drive south on Vale Road, which continues into Trunkey Road.
    • Continue until you come to the T-intersection at Trunkey Creek and turn left onto Goulburn Road
    • The turnoff to Abercrombie Caves is on your left approximately 13km after the township of Trunkey Creek onto Caves Road

    From Goulburn:

    • Drive north west from passing the townships of Crookwell and Binda
    • Approximately 10km after the township of Binda, turn to the right towards Tuena.
    • The turnoff to Abercrombie Caves is on your right approximately 16km after the township of Trunkey Creek onto Caves Road

    Park entry points

    • Abercrombie Karst Conservation Reserve See on map

    Parking

    Parking available at Abercrombie Caves carpark

    Maps and downloads

    Accessibility

    Disability access level - no wheelchair access

    Not wheelchair-accessible

    Learn more

    Belfry Cave tour is in Abercrombie Karst Conservation Reserve. Here are just some of the reasons why this park is special:

    Bushrangers

    Abercrombie Karst Conservationa Reserve. Photo: Boris Hlavica

    In 1830 armed settlers, mounted police, and an army regiment fought it out with the Ribbon Gang near the caves. Ralph Entwistle, a convict servant, led a rebellion of convicts at Bathurst. His gang became known as 'The Ribbon Gang' because many of its members were said to have worn white ribbons in their hats.

    • Mount Gray walking track Mount Gray walking track, near Abercrombie Caves, is a bushwalk to the relics of a historic mining site. It continues on to the magnificent waterfalls and scenic views at Grove Creek Falls.

    Caves of time

    North Arch, Abercrombie Karst Conservation Reserve. Photo: OEH

    Abercrombie Caves and the surrounding area is part of the traditional country of the Burra Burra group, who are part of the larger Wiradjuri tribe. The Burra Burra group knew about the caves, although no Aboriginal artifacts have been found in Arch Cave itself. However, in 1977 a research team found stone tools and animal bones, inlcuding some from extinct animals, in a shelter north of the Great Arch.

    Natural wonders

    Abercrombie Karst Conservationa Reserve. Photo: Boris Hlavica

    The natural wonders of Abercrombie Karst Conservation Reserve will inspire you. Rare plant species such as laurel-leaf grevilleas and Chalker's wattle brighten the area with vibrant shades of yellow and red. Lucky visitors may also catch a glimpse of wildlife such as vulnerable peregrine falcons and sugar gliders lurking through the trees. Wallabies are also known to call Abercrombie Karst Conservation Reserve home, so be sure to keep an eye out.

    Underground wonders

    Abercrombie Caves, Abercrombie Karst Conservation Reserve. Photo: Boris Hlavica

    As early as 1821, the Sydney Gazette reported that 'a cave of considerable dimensions has been recently discovered in the neighbourhood of Bathurst'. There's no wonder that almost 200 years later the caves attract visitors from far and wide. The famous Arch Cave is 221 metres long, 60 metres wide at both ends and 30 metres high in the middle. It's considered the largest cave of its type in the southern hemisphere. Join a cave tour and discover the incredible natural world underground.

    • Archway Cave self-guided tour Take a self-guided tour of Archway Cave at Abercrombie Caves. It has the largest natural arch in the southern hemisphere. Its special features include the gold miners dance platform, built in 1880.
    • Belfry Cave tour This guided tour of Belfry Cave takes in the upper levels of the Archway at Abercrombie Caves. It's for adventurous spirits – you'll cross a suspension bridge and climb ladders just to get to there!
    • Bushrangers Cave tour Bushrangers Cave is named for the bushrangers who roamed the rugged Abercrombie Ranges in 1830, and used the cave as a shelter. Join this guided tour at Abercrombie Caves to find out more.
    • Grove Cave tour Feeling adventurous? If you are, join a challenging guided tour of Grove Cave at Abercrombie Caves. It's made up of tight narrow passages, high ceilings and white walls.
    • Grove Creek Falls walking track Grove Creek Falls is a must-see for visitors to the Abercrombie Caves area. This walking track offers magnificent waterfalls, bushwalking, fishing and picnicking.

    Plants and animals you may see

    Animals

    • Eastern bentwing bat. Photo: Ken Stepnell

      Eastern bentwing-bat (Miniopterus schreibersii oceanensis)

      In colonies numbering up to 150,000, eastern bentwing-bats congregate in caves across the east and north-west coasts of Australia. These small Australian animals weigh around 13-17g and can reach speeds of up to 50km per hour. Eastern bentwing-bats use both sight and echolocation to catch small insects mid-air.

    • Swamp wallaby in Murramarang National Park. Photo: David Finnegan

      Swamp wallaby (Wallabia bicolor)

      The swamp wallaby, also known as the black wallaby or black pademelon, lives in the dense understorey of rainforests, woodlands and dry sclerophyll forest along eastern Australia. This unique Australian macropod has a dark black-grey coat with a distinctive light-coloured cheek stripe.

    • Closeup of a laughing kookaburra's head and body. Photo: Rosie Nicolai/OEH

      Kookaburra (Dacelo novaeguineae)

      Of the 2 species of kookaburra found in Australia, the laughing kookaburra is the best-known and the largest of the native kingfishers. With its distinctive riotous call, the laughing kookaburra is commonly heard in open woodlands and forests throughout NSW national parks, making these ideal spots for bird watching.

    •  Superb lyrebird, Minnamurra Rainforest, Budderoo National Park. Photo: David Finnegan

      Superb lyrebird (Menura novaehollandiae)

      With a complex mimicking call and an elaborate courtship dance to match, the superb lyrebird is one of the most spectacular Australian animals. A bird watching must-see, the superb lyrebird can be found in rainforests and wet woodlands across eastern NSW and Victoria.

    Environments in this park

    Education resources (1)

    Entrance to Archway Cave, Abercrombie Caves, Abercrombie Karst Conservation Reserve. Photo: Stephen Babka/DPIE