Judges House

Murramarang National Park

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Overview

If you yearn for a peaceful holiday on the South Coast, Judges House is for you. Surrounded by bush and a secluded beach in beautiful Murramarang National Park, you'll feel a world away from nearby Batemans Bay.

Accommodation Details
Accommodation type Cottage
Where 1 Judges Road, Benandarah, NSW, 2536 - in Murramarang National Park
Bedrooms 3
Maximum guests 6
Facilities Barbecue facilities, carpark, showers, toilets, electric power
What to bring Drinking water, shampoo and soap, hairdryer, food supplies
Price

Rates and availability display when making an online booking. Minimum stays may apply.

Entry fees

Park entry fees apply and can be paid at the time of booking. Park entry fees are not included in your accommodation fees.

Bookings Bookings are required. Book online or call the National Parks Contact Centre on 1300 072 757.
Please note
  • A $300 security bond will be held against your card on the day of arrival or the day before.
  • Check in after 3pm. Check out before 10am.
  • Judges House is located 100m from Yellow Rock Beach House.

A stay at this coastal cottage has something for everyone. Fishers can cast a line and bring home the evening catch. Kayakers can hit the water all day. There's a variety of surrounding trails for bushwalkers to explore, including short walks around North Head and Acheron Ledge walking track nearby. Enjoy the water view from the shaded timber deck and a swim at the sheltered beach, tucked away from the crowds.

The refurbished beach house has all the modern comforts. Huge windows bring the outside in, and you’ll feel immersed in nature. The only other property nearby is Yellow Rock Beach House, 100m away. Judges House was formerly owned by a Supreme Court judge and enjoyed as a family getaway. It’s great for active families, friends travelling together, bushwalkers and couples on a quiet getaway.

In winter, it’s an ideal spot for whale watching. Bird watchers will love it here at any time of the year. Murramarang National Park abounds in bird life, from owl species to sea birds and even a penguin colony.

For directions, safety and practical information, see visitor info

Nearby

  • Water views from the deck at Yellow Rock Beach House in Murramarang National Park. Photo: John Spencer/DPIE

    Yellow Rock Beach House

    Book a quiet mini break at Yellow Rock Beach House in Murramarang National Park near Batemans Bay. This secluded spot has its own private beach and water views from the deck, with swimming and fishing opportunities a few steps away.

Map


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Current alerts in this area

There are no current alerts in this area.

Local alerts

For the latest updates on fires, closures and other alerts in this area, see https://www.nationalparks.nsw.gov.au/camping-and-accommodation/accommodation/judges-house/local-alerts

Bookings

Operated by

Park info

See more visitor info

Visitor info

All the practical information you need to know about Judges House.

Getting there and parking

Judges House is in the southern section of Murramarang National Park. To get there from the Princes Highway:

  • Turn onto South Durras Road and follow for about 2km
  • Turn right onto North Head Road and when you come to the T-intersection turn left.
  • Drive for 500m and turn right. Follow this road for 2km (veering right at the painted yellow rock when required).
  • Pass through the gate on the right side, with ‘Private Property’ written on it. Follow the road for about 2km.
  • The house is the first building on your right side, overlooking the water.

Access code

You’ll need an access code to get through the gate. We’ll email you the code after you book.

Road quality

  • Unsealed roads

Vehicle access

  • 2WD vehicles

Weather restrictions

  • All weather

Parking

Parking is available for up to 2 cars.

Facilities

  • This property has an onsite caretaker.
  • The cottage has 3 bedrooms. Bedrooms 1 and 2 have a queen bed and bedroom 3 has 2 king single beds.
  • Bed sheets, blankets, pillows, pillowcases and bath towels are provided.
  • The cottage has 1 bathroom with a shower, toilet and hand basin. There is also an outdoor toilet and outdoor shower.
  • There’s a fully-equipped open plan kitchen with an oven and gas cooktop, fridge, microwave and dishwasher.
  • Ceiling fan and slow combustion heater in the lounge room
  • Outdoor deck and furniture
  • There is only untreated tank water. Bring your own drinking water.
  • There is mobile phone reception.

Toilets

  • Flush toilets

Barbecue facilities

  • Gas/electric barbecues (free)

Carpark

Parking is available for up to 2 cars.

Showers

  • Hot showers

Electric power

Solar power only.

Maps and downloads

Safety messages

Beach safety

Beaches in this park are not patrolled, and can sometimes have strong rips and currents. These beach safety tips will help you and your family stay safe in the water.

Boating safety

If you're out on your boat fishing, waterskiing or just cruising the waterways, the safety of you and your passengers is paramount.

Bushwalking safety

If you're keen to head out on a longer walk or a backpack camp, always be prepared. Read these bushwalking safety tips before you set off on a walking adventure in national parks.

Cycling safety

Hundreds of cyclists head to our national parks for fun and adventure. If you're riding your bike through a national park, read these mountain biking and cycling safety tips.

Fire safety

During periods of fire weather, the Commissioner of the NSW Rural Fire Service may declare a total fire ban for particular NSW fire areas, or statewide. Learn more about total fire bans and fire safety.

Fishing safety

Fishing from a boat, the beach or by the river is a popular activity for many national park visitors. If you’re planning a day out fishing, check out these fishing safety tips.

Mobile safety

Dial Triple Zero (000) in an emergency. Download the Emergency Plus app before you visit, it helps emergency services locate you using your smartphone's GPS. Please note there is limited mobile phone reception in this park and you’ll need mobile reception to call Triple Zero (000).

Paddling safety

To make your paddling or kayaking adventure safer and more enjoyable, check out these paddling safety tips.

Wildlife safety

Keep yourself and our wildlife safe by understanding the risks of wildlife encounters and how to avoid them.

Accessibility

Disability access level - medium

The house is wheelchair friendly, but is not fully wheelchair accessible:

  • There is a ramp entry to the house and no internal steps.
  • The internal bathroom shower is frameless, but the toilet does not have hand rails for support.

Wheelchair users may need assistance in some surrounding areas that have uneven grassy surfaces.

Permitted

Cycling

Fishing

A current NSW recreational fishing licence is required when fishing in all waters.

Prohibited

Camping

Gathering firewood

Generators

Horses

Pets

Pets and domestic animals (other than certified assistance animals) are not permitted. Find out which regional parks allow dogs and see the pets in parks policy for more information.

Learn more

Judges House is in Murramarang National Park. Here are just some of the reasons why this park is special:

Bird watching

Murramarang National Park. Photo: David Finnegan

Birdwatchers are in for a treat; the park boasts more than 90 species of birdlife including three owl species, peregrine falcons, sea eagles, gannets, shearwaters, white-faced storm petrels, sooty oystercatchers, eastern yellow robins, satin bowerbirds, the rufous fantail and even a penguin colony. Look for the sea eagles and peregrine falcons soaring above the park’s cliffs and headlands and the rufous fantails and eastern yellow robins in rainforest gullies around Durras Mountain. You’re most likely to see sooty oystercatchers wading around the edges of lake areas.

Native animals

Australian King-parrot (Alisterus scapularis), Murramarang National Park. Photo: David Finnegan

There’s an abundance of wildlife living in Murramarang National Park, but by far one of the highlights is seeing eastern grey kangaroos that spend their days dozing near the beaches and by campgrounds until dusk when they gather to feed. In the moist forests of the park you might see lyrebirds fossicking in leaf litter. Look for the stately, strutting wonga pigeon with its pastel blue-grey back feathers and black dotted stomach. If you don’t see it, you may well hear its repetitive, deep ‘whoop, whoop’ call that carries through the forest.

  • Burrawang walking track Burrawang walking track, across Depot Beach Headland, features scenic coastal views, forests and birdwatching in Murramarang National Park, near Batemans Bay.
  • Richmond Beach Richmond Beach is one of Murramarang’s hidden treasures. Just 50m from the carpark on an easy walking track you can enjoy picnicking, swimming, snorkelling, fishing and paddling.

Native vegetation

Dark Beach walking track, Murramarang National Park. Photo:Michael Van Ewijk

One of the really special things in Murramarang is the forest of majestic spotted gums; it’s one of the biggest continuous stands in NSW. With an understorey of burrawang palms, the forest stretches right down to the ocean and is truly a sight to see. You’ll easily recognise the spotted gums – they have a smooth, dimpled bark which is shed in summer to produce a mottled cream and grey ‘spotted’ appearance.

  • Dark Beach walking track Dark Beach walking track leads to a secluded beach with unique rock formations in Murramarang National Park. Ideal for fishing, swimming and snorkelling.
  • Depot Beach Rainforest walk Depot Beach marks the start and end of this easy walk through lush littoral rainforest. Go for a swim, surf, snorkel or paddle in the clear waters when you return.
  • Rock Platform walk - Depot Beach Rock Platform walk near Depot Beach is a short walk to fascinating rockpools offering excellent birdwatching and scenic ocean views of the South Coast, just north of Batemans Bay.

Rich Aboriginal cultural heritage

Pebbly Beach, Murramarang National Park. Photo: John Yurasek

Aboriginal people have a long connection with the Country of Murramarang National Park, and this continues to the present day. The south coast headlands have long been a focus for economic life, giving easy access to the food resources of both the sea and the land, and plants within the park provided medicines and shelter. There is much evidence of the past today, including shell middens, tool manufacturing sites and indications of a specialised industry producing bone points and fishing hooks. Take a walk around Murramarang Aboriginal Area, near Bawley Point - there's a complex of middens that are of great cultural value.

  • Then and now: Aboriginal culture This excursion experience has been updated and is now being delivered in line with the new NSW Department of Education Curriculum. We will be revising this excursion's name and information online soon. Contact your local national parks office for more information about the updated excursion.
  • Then and now: Aboriginal culture This excursion experience has been updated and is now being delivered in line with the new NSW Department of Education Curriculum. We will be revising this excursion's name and information online soon. Contact your local national parks office for more information about the updated excursion.
  • Then and now: Aboriginal culture This excursion experience has been updated and is now being delivered in line with the new NSW Department of Education Curriculum. We will be revising this excursion's name and information online soon. Contact your local national parks office for more information about the updated excursion.
  • Wasp Head walk This short walk leads to a spectacular view of Wasp Island and passes through historic Aboriginal sites of the area.

Plants and animals you may see

Animals

  • Satin bowerbird. Photo: Ken Stepnell

    Satin bowerbird (Ptilonorhynchus violaceus)

    With vibrant blue-violet eyes and curious antics, the satin bowerbird is a favourite for bird watching and easy to spot as it forages for food in open forest. Relatively common across eastern Australia, in NSW they’re found in coastal rainforests and adjacent woodlands and mountain ranges.

Plants

  • Blueberry ash. Photo: Jaime Plaza

    Blueberry ash (Elaeocarpus reticulatus)

    The blueberry ash is a rainforest shrub which produces blue olive-shaped berries and spectacular bell-shaped flowers, which often appear on the plant together. It is a tall slender shrub or small tree found in rainforest, tall eucalypt forest and coastal bushland in eastern NSW, south-east Queensland and Victoria.

  •  Black sheoak. Photo: Barry Collier

    Black sheoak (Allocasuarina littoralis)

    The black sheoak is one of a number of casuarina species found across the east coast of Australia and nearby tablelands. Growing to a height of 5-15m, these hardy Australian native plants can survive in poor or sandy soils. The barrel-shaped cone of the black sheoak grows to 10-30mm long.

  • Cabbage tree palm in Dalrymple-Hay Nature Reserve. Photo: John Spencer/OEH

    Cabbage palm (Livistona australis)

    With glossy green leaves spanning 3-4m in length and a trunk reaching a height of up to 30m, the cabbage tree palm, or fan palm, is one of the tallest Australian native plants. Thriving in rainforest margins along the east coast of NSW, in summer this giant palm produces striking spikes of cream flowers which resemble cabbages.

  • Wonga Wonga vine. Photo: Barry Collier

    Wonga wonga vine (Pandorea pandorana)

    The wonga wonga vine is a widespread vigorous climber usually found along eastern Australia. A variation of the plant occurs in the central desert, where it resembles a sprawling shrub. One of the more common Australian native plants, the wonga wonga vine produces bell-shaped white or yellow flowers in the spring, followed by a large oblong-shaped seed pod.

Environments in this park

Education resources (1)

School excursions (3)